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Full text of "Saint Leo College Catalogue"

SAINT LEO COLLEGE 




CATALOGUE 1 964 - 1 967 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/saintleocollege196467sain 



SAINT LEO 
COLLEGE 




CATALOGUE 

1964-1967 



That In All Things God May Be Glorified 



1964 



SEPTEMBER 






OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


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S M T W T F S 


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27 28 29 30 . . . . 


. ^ 


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27 28 29 30 31 


1965 


JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 




MARCH 


APRIL 


1 


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.. 


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•• 


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25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


SEPTEMBER 






OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 


4 
11 




1 


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.. 


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26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 



1966 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


1 


.... 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


.... 12 3 4 5 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


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16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 . . . . 


30 31 







APRIL 



12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER 

12 3 1 .... 12 3 4 5 12 3 

456789 10 2345678 6789 10 11 12 456789 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

30 31 

1 967 

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 

12 34567 1234 1234 1 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

29 30 31 26 27 28 26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendar 2 

General Information . 5 

Directory 

Communications 

History ' 

Aims 

Counseling 

Student Service - 

Toward the Full Life 

Accreditations and Affiliations 

Campus Facilities 

Services 

Evening Program 

Academic Program 15 

The Integrative Core and Basic Program 

Fields of Concentration 

Flexibility 

Seminars 

Comprehensives 

Student Life and Activities 26 

Religious Life 

Social Life 

Student Service 

Campus Organizations 

Athletic and Recreational Programs 

Reminders from the Student Handbook 

Academic Regulations 31 

Academic Status 

Degree Requirements 

Honors 

Change of Regulation 

Financial Regulations 38 

Tuition and Fees 
Financial Aid 

Program and Courses of Instruction 43 

Concentrations 
Teacher Education Program 
Numbering of Courses 
Courses of Instruction 



Organization of the College 89 

Board of Trustees 

Advisory Board 

Administration 

Staff 

Faculty 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



DIRECTORY 

Location 

Saint Leo College is on State Road No. 52, four miles west of Dade City, 
Florida (U.S. Highway 301); one mile east of San Antonio, Florida; forty 
miles northeast of Tampa; sixty miles northeast of St. Petersburg; seventy- 
five miles southwest of Orlando; and thirty miles northwest of Lakeland. 

Dade City is served by the Seaboard Air Line and the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroads and the Greyhound Bus Line. Taxi service is available at all times 
between the College and Dade City. San Antonio is served by the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad. 

Tampa International Airport is served by a number of major airlines. 

Information 

Requests for information should be addressed to: 

Director of Admissions 
Saint Leo CoUege 
Saint Leo, Florida 

Address for Correspondence and Shipments 

Ail letters, parcel post, and express should be addressed to: 
Saint Leo College 
Saint Leo, Florida 



All telegrams should be addressed to: 

Saint Leo College 
Dade City, Florida 

All freight should be addressed to: 

Saint Leo College 
San Antonio, Florida 



5] 



COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTORY 

Correspondence should be addressed to the college officers indicated below 
and mailed to: Saint Leo College, Saint Leo, Florida 33574. 

Academic Affairs Dean of Academic Affairs 

Academic Records, Transcripts Registrar 

Admissions and Catalogues Director of Admissions 

Alumni Affairs Director of Alumni Relations 

Athletics Director of Athletics 

Development Program Director of Development 

Financial Transactions Bursar 

General College Policy President 

Housing Accommodation Dean of Student Affairs 

Library Information Librarian 

Publicity Information Director of Publicity 

Rehgious Matters Chaplain 

Student Activities Dean of Student Affairs 

Veterans Affairs Registrar 

Office hours are from 9:00 a. m. until 4:30 p. m. Monday through Friday, 
except on holy days of obligation and on legal holidays. Members of the 
coUege staff are available for interviews by appointment. 

The telephone number is: 588-3821. 

Tfxephone Directory 

Telephone service is through the Dade City Exchange: 

Saint Leo College Offices . . . 588-3821 

588-2431 

Saint Leo HaU 588-9961 

Roderick HaU 588-9995 

588-9931 
Saint Edward's Hall .... 588-9911 

Saint Anne Hall 588-2661 

Rose HaU 588-3732 

Campuside 588-3649 

Villa Marie 588-2839 

Holy Name 588-2041 

[6] 



HISTORY 

The Benedictine monks who operate Saint Leo College have long been 
known as educators. It was their founder, St. Benedict of Monte Cassino, 
Italy, in the sixth century, who more than any other figure of his time laid 
the foundation of Western civilization as we know it now. Bands of his 
followers spread throughout Europe, setting up monasteries and schools 
to preserve and to build up the remains of the collapsed Roman Empire. 
Under the Benedictines' cultural leadership, the migrating Eastern hordes 
were converted to Christianity and became the forerunners of present-day 
European nations. 

Saint Leo College is rooted in nearly three-quarters of a century of educa- 
tional service to a developing, changing, and expanding region. In 1889 the 
Order of Saint Benedict of Florida declared its determination to establish 
a college by obtaining from the State a charter granting the legal right. 
On June 4, 1889, the Legislature of the State of Florida granted that the 
Order of Saint Benedict of Florida "shall have and possess the right and 
power of conferring the usual academic and other degrees granted by any 
college^ in this state." 

The aim was to provide for the youth of the region, especially for Catholic 
youth, an education of high quality. At the time Florida was a young 
state, having been admitted to statehood only forty-four years earlier. 
Central Florida, in which Saint Leo is located, was then in many ways 
frontier country. In keeping with the times, the first institution established 
was known as Saint Leo Military Academy, even as the present University 
of Florida was then known as The East Florida Seminary. It, too, had its 
cadets and its uniforms. 

As the state developed and education practices and institutions changed, 
Saint Leo Military Academy became Saint Leo Preparatory School. Fully 
accredited, it offered a program of excellence not only for the college-bound 
but also for those for whom its program was terminal. 

By midcentury the Benedictines of Saint Leo recognized the obhgation to 
provide higher education for CathoHc and other Christian youth who 
wanted to face the realities of their age with confidence in themselves and 
in their fellowmen. So in 1956 they established the lower division of Saint 
Leo College, which, meeting aU standards of state junior colleges, opened 
its doors in 1959. 

During the school year 1962-1963 the faculty bent itself to the two-fold 
task of evaluating the program originally organized to provide only the 
first two years of college work and of projecting the complete four-year 

[7] 



program. As the college faculty studied the implications involved in a 
distinctive four-year program, it became more and more obvious that the 
program must be predicated on the nature of man, his origin and destiny, 
and the kinds of relationship required of him to function adequately and 
creatively and purposefully in fulfilling his nature and its needs. As a result 
of the study, the College was reorganized administratively and philosophi- 
cally into two broad functional areas: those which are primarily academic 
(under the Dean of Academic Affairs) and those which are primarily student- 
life oriented (under the Dean of Student Affairs). 

Under the academic the student is seen as developing his knowledge in 
five broad fields or divisions: 

1. Philosophy, Theology, and Education 

2. Literature and Foreign Language 

3. Art and Music 

4. Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

5. Social Science. 

The first division represents man's attempt to live life with meaning and 
purpose. The second and third represent his attempt to express himself and 
to communicate with others his thoughts and ideals and his concepts of beauty 
and usefulness. The fourth represents his exploration of the world about him 
and the tools he uses to explore it. The fifth represents his attempt to under- 
stand himself in the milieu of association with other human beings and to 
pursue his goals in cooperation with, and respectful of, the rights of others. 

To support the thesis that all these divisions are important Saint Leo Col- 
lege now expects all students to investigate each one in some measure. 
Further, it expects that as their horizons are broadened the students will 
see more and more relationships which will enable them to approach life in 
a more meaningful way. Depth comes not only with further courses in a 
field but also in the continued application of knowledge throughout the 
whole college experience. No area is considered a closed book just because 
the student is no longer taking a course in it. 

As the student moves to upper division work his program will be based 
upon the concept of concentration rather than majors and minors. This 
means that he will always be asked to see his particular interest area in rela- 
tion to the whole of knowledge rather than as a series of isolated subjects. 
The important question which will be asked of the prospective graduate 
is not "Has he completed a certain number of courses?" but "Has he moved 
significantly toward the goal of becoming an educated person?" 

In the broad area of student affairs the College approaches student life 
not as a way of providing for excess of time and energy but as a means of 
fulfilling each student's need to be, and to be considered as, and adequate 

18] 



person and a worthy and responsible member of human society. Therefore, 
recognition of the God-man relationship is necessary; self-government with- 
in the prescribed reahty of his present situation as a student is necessary; 
provision for development and use of his leisure time is necessary; and op- 
portunity for offering the results of his individual talents and abilities for 
the benefit of others is necessary. Thus, this need for adequacy, worth, and 
responsibility is provided for in the various student programs: the religious 
program; the government and club program; the social and athletic pro- 
grams; and the student service program. 

OUR AIMS 

Through its total program Saint Leo College assists the student to inte- 
grate his intellectual development with understanding and acceptance of 
his personal responsibhty to God, to himself, to other men, and to the 
world in which he lives. In brief, the aim is that each young man and 
young woman who enrolls in Saint Leo College make progress toward be- 
coming a liberally educated person. For the liberally educated person sees 
life in its entirety and is able to view himself in his proper relationship to 
God, man, and the world. 

Through directed and independent study each student acquaints himself 
with the liberalizing arts and sciences — the major areas of human know- 
ledge. Specifically, he seeks from the study of theology and philosophy 
ultimate truth and strengthens his will to pursue ultimate good. He gains 
insights and values which serve as bases of judgment and guides to action in 
his confrontation of personal perplexities and problems and complexities of 
the contemporary world. Through the intensive study of two languages 
and their Hteratures — his own and one other — he extends and refines his 
ability to communicate with increasing thousands of his contemporaries. 
He acquires through art and music a deeper sensitivity to, and awareness of, 
beauty in man's creations, and he nourishes his own creativity. He gains 
insight into the development and impact upon the modern world of the 
mathematical and physical sciences. Through the social sciences, he comes 
to understand the culture of his country and is able to compare it with 
other great cultures in our interdependent world. He comes also to have a 
clear grasp of economic, social, and political problems and principles — an 
understanding requisite to responsible citizenship in our times. 

As he broadens his base of knowledge, discovers relationships within 
fields of knowledge, probes his motivations and interests, and tests his talents, 
he moves confidently toward self-direction, choice of a field of concentra- 
tion, and ultimate commitment. Thus, he prepares himself for his field of 
specialization, whatever it may be. Through self-discovery and continuous 

[9] 



development, he comes to grips with reahty, and cherishing his individuahty, 
walks with confidence among his peers. For he is a "man of principles, 
aware of the complexities of the world in which he is living, equipped to 
take his rightful place in that world, to judge it and to influence it." 

From the day the student is admitted to Saint Leo College until the day 
he leaves, a full-fledged graduate, he is a person of concern and importance 
to all members of the faculty and the administration. Through the academic 
program he furthers his intellectual development; through the total program 
of the College which fosters his social, civic, and spiritual hfe, he integrates 
his intellectual achievement by his living every day with and among his 
fellow students, teachers, and his widening and continuing circle of friends. 

COUNSELING 

The recognition that e?ch person is sacred in the sight of God, preciously 
redeemed, places him in the context of value far beyond a numerical statistic 
of measured success or failure as judged by some future historian of Saint 
Leo College. It places us presently, the members of the college team, in a 
partnership relation of exploring the potential of each young man or young 
woman who is facing the educational and personal problems which attend 
the expanding horizons of knowledge of self and the world. 

Counseling, then, is not a narrow segment of student experience that is 
measured by some remarks placed in a student's personal folder: indeed the 
multifaceted contacts which the student has with many members of the 
college faculty plus his association in casual contact with his peers are very 
pervasive forces in the moulding of human character. The genuine interest 
by almost every member of the faculty and the unmeasurable concern that 
the "bruised reed be not broken," as our founder Saint Benedict gently 
reminds the Abbot, are part of the hallmark of the Benedictine college. 

Coupled with this pattern of "I care" is the more specific relation of the 
assigned faculty member who is the student's personal associate during 
the college year. Working with him, the student not only organizes his pro- 
gram of studies but also learns the significance of the ways, the traditions, the 
operation of the college and his part in it. During his years of upper division 
work, the faculty member he chooses will normally be one who under- 
stands his more specific aspirations because he himself has trod the same path. 

One of the very important parts of the engagement with reahty that a 
student makes at the College takes place through the General Seminar. On a 
random basis each student as part of a small group of other freshmen, sopho- 
mores, and upperclassmen meets in periodic discussion throughout the year 
on significant issues confronting student society or the larger social context. 
On the average of once a month prominent educators explore with the 

[10] 



students relevant research in the area of their disciphnes. The pattern of 
questions which the students ask of the speakers as a result of their own dis- 
cussions points again and again to the search for value in their lives. 

STUDENT SERVICE 

The concept behind this area of the student's total program is a logical 
outcome of the Benedictine spirit of cooperative endeavor. It has its roots 
in the religious, social, and psychological needs of every person to contribute 
to the welfare of the group to which he belongs and to the individuals who 
are companion members of the group. Basically, one might say that it is the 
opportunity offered to each to contribute a share of his energy and talent to 
the well-being of the community of which he is a part; it is a fostering of 
that concern that leads to deeper involvement and commitment, v/hich are 
among the qualities found in the educated man. 

The student's engagement in its simplest form may take the pattern 
of community house-keeping responsibilities but may run the gamut of any 
of those activities — hbrary, workshop, assistantships in sports or in residence 
halls, or dedicated involvement in campus activities. It is the very nature 
of service that it is qualitative — a thing of spirit rather than of matter; it 
cannot be measured adequately by quantitative means. However, the 
minimum expect? tion of all students is the contribution of at least five 
hours of service per week. Many students show the depth of their under- 
standing, social concern, and commitment by acceptance of responsibility 
beyond the expected minimum and in more than one area. 

TOWARDS THE FULL LIFE 

College has been defined as a place where contemplation in search of 
meaning is the daily exercise, where teachers ponder the deep questions of 
Hfe, and students learn the science and art of so doing. For all that, college is 
not just a preparation for a future full life; it is an experiment in living, a 
testing of principle, a fulfillment in its own right. So almost every college 
sees as part of its vision the cultivation of religious reverence and duty, the 
stimulation of physical athletic exercise, the pleasure of social contact, the 
sharing of fraternal association, and the awakening of public-aifairs-minded- 
ness. 

Saint Leo College attempts to provide these in due measure. We would be 
naive to claim that we succeed in providing them to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. Each faculty member in charge of a program wishes that it might 
be better; each student might be expected to wish likewise though the reasons 
would not necessarily coincide with the wish. Sometimes the desire to 

[11] 



offer more freedom to students is greater than they wish to accept because 
they are not ready for the maturity of responsibility that is involved. For all 
that, the virtues of living together in mutual endeavor become evident with 
the passage of time and the intangible awareness "that things are right" 
emerges imperceptibly with the growth of intellectual and emotional stature 
and the ripening into mature character. 

ACCREDITATIONS AND AFFILIATIONS 

The four year program has the approval of the State Department of 
Education. As approved it is acceptable for Veterans benefits and for ad- 
mission to state universities. 

AffiHation with The Catholic University of iVmerica permits reasonable 
assurance of acceptance by Catholic and other private universities. 

Membership in the Florida Association of Colleges and Universities and 
in the Council for the Advancement of Small Colleges (whose aim is the de- 
velopment of quality education in small colleges) is held presently. Member- 
ship in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools usually requires 
the graduation of three classes. 

Administrative functions and positions are organized following the 
recommendations of the Association of American Colleges. 

CAMPUS FACILITIES 

The Campus of Saint Leo College consists of two hundred fifty acres of 
rolling hill country edging on beautiful Lake Jo vita. Facilities for outdoor 
and indoor sports are located on the campus and inchide the gymnasium, 
baseball field, track, tennis courts, handball courts, and volleyball courts, 
and a nine-hole golf course. Lake Jo vita offers excellent swimming facilities. 

Saint Edward Hall (1927, remodeling 1963). Living quarters for col- 
lege students, the college student security center, and infirmary facilities 

Saint Francis Hall (1952). Administrative offices, classrooms, labora- 
tory and lecture rooms for the college science courses — biology, chemistry, 
physics 

Gymnasium (1945). Focal point of the college athletic program for both 
intramural and varsity sports 

Auditorium (1956). Theatrical productions and a wide movie screen for 
the showing of cinemascope films. It also houses the organ room and 
several music practice rooms. 

Saint Leo Hall (1904, addition 1914). Administrative offices, hving 
quarters 

[12] 



Abbey Church (1947). The heart of the reUgious Hfe of the College 

Library (1958) Includes conference rooms, an outstanding Floridiana 
collection and a fine Golden Age record collection 

Roderick Hall (1959). Living quarters for men 

Crawford Hall (1961). Classrooms, faculty offices, and administrative 
offices 

McDonald Student Center (1962). Cafeteria, snack-bar, student lounges 
and recreation preas. Post Office, and bookstore 

Rec' Hall (1954). Dances, games, T. V., freight lifting. 

SERVICES 

Guidance 

As indicated (in the section on aims) the College provides this very im- 
portant service not only by individual but also by group counseling sessions. 
In fact, the whole program is organized to offer the maximum opportunity 
for each student to discover the significance of many kinds of relationships 
to himself so that he will see himself as adequate to confront his present 
situation and as capable of organizing his future plans in the light of his 
selected goals. 

Workshops 

In addition to the science and the foreign language laboratories, the art 
studios, and the various services of the main library, the College provides 
workshops in reading, mathematics, and English. The workshops are open 
from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m., Monday through Friday of each week except 
on holy days or legal holidays. In the workshop students may receive special 
help on their studies from teachers and qualified assistants. Use of the work- 
shops is an opportunity not a requirement. They are to assist the student, 
no matter what his achievement may be, to clear up difficulties which he 
recognizes as impeding his intellectual progress. 

Student Insurance and Health Service 

All resident students are covered by insurance for sickness and accident 
during their stay at Saint Leo. Under the policy they are also entitled to 
the normal infirmary needs. Day students may elect such coverage. 

THE EVENING PROGRAM 

In keeping with its intention to serve the needs of the surrounding com- 
munities, Saint Leo College inaugurated a program of evening classes during 
the 1959-1960 college year offering both credit and non-credit courses. 

[13] 



The evening courses are designed to provide to those interested persons 
the opportunity to acquire added knov^ledge, to enrich their hves, to increase 
their efficiency in their daily work, or to further their steps toward the goal 
of a college education. These college-level subjects are a means whereby the 
employed adult, the teacher seeking to meet certification standards, the 
home-maker, or any other person interested in cultural enrichment may 
have an opportunity for study. 

The evening classes meet once a week for three hours. Trimesters start 
early in September and early in January each year and run for fifteen weeks. 



[14] 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



The academic program of Saint Leo College is student-centered. As has 
been pointed out in the statement of aims, the purpose of the College is to 
assist each student to move confidently toward the goal of becom^ing a truly- 
educated Christian of the twentieth century. Thus the program provides 
for the variations which students show in goals, social and emotional ma- 
turity, rate of development, and intellectual achievement. Moreover, the 
program is firmly rooted in philosophy and theology — its heart — through 
which the student may derive and clarify his values and formulate principles 
for action. It provides also for the common interests, mutual concerns, and 
common responsibilities which liberally educated Christians in a democratic 
society share as citizens. Through foundation courses in the great disciplines 
embraced by the liberal arts and sciences, the student broadens the scope of 
his knowledge, discovers relationships which serve as an integrative force, 
tests his interests, and begins to move to a clear formulation of his particular 
intellectual and vocational goals. He is then ready to select and move into 
one of the fields of concentration provided in the upper division — the 
junior and the senior years — of the College. Here he broadens and deepens 
his knowledge of the selected field and relates it to the meanings he has dis- 
covered in other fields. In his program of concentration, tailored to his 
needs and goals, he lays the foundation both in breadth and depth for his 
professional or vocational career. He does not specialize. On the contrary, 
he makes himself ready for the specialization that he will pursue intensively 
and knowledgeably in the graduate school, in the specialized training insti- 
stutes provided by industry, or in adult inservice education programs of one 
kind or another. 
The major features of the academic program described below are as follows: 

1. The integrative core or basic program required of aU students 

2. Fields of concentration from which the student may select the one most 
appropriate to his interests and goals 

3. Flexibihty in organization which facilitates meeting individual dif- 
ferences in background and^purpose^and provides for guided individual 
work and research and independent study 

4. Seminars; general; college-wide lecture; divisional senior 

5. Comprehensives. 



{15 



THE INTEGRATIVE CORE OR BASIC PROGRAM 

The greater part of the required basic or core program is completed within 
the freshman and sophomore years — the lower division of the College 
(cf requirements for graduation, p 35 and also classification of students 
for each year). Of the 132 credits hours required as a minimum for gradua- 
tion with the Bachelor's Degree, 84 are included in the basic or core program. 
Required fields, with the number of credit hours in each, are as follows: 
English 6 Art and Music 9 

Philosophy 12 Social Science 12 

Theology 12 Literature 6 

Science and Foreign Language 6 

Mathematics 15 General Seminar 6 

There is, however, some flexibility in choice in the required areas as may be 
seen in the following explanations. 

English 

A full-year course in English is required. For most students this course will 
be Eh 101-102 — Thought and Expression: Basic Freshman English. However, 
students having a high qualitative proficiency in English may apply for 
English courses above the freshman level, such as Eh 205-206 — The Short 
Story and the Novel; Eh 207-208 — Enjoyment of Literature Through Drama; 
Eh 21U212— Creative Writing; and Eh 213-214— Great Books: Non-Fiction. 
Or they may have the English requirement waived and take six hours of 
work in another field of special interest to them. 

Philosophy 

Twelve hours of philosophy are required. Philosophy is not, as a general 
rule, begun until the sophomore year except by those students who expect 
to concentrate in it; they must take Py 103 — Logic. Students who have been 
permitted to waive Eh 101-102 may take one course in philosophy in their 
freshman year. All other students are required to take Py 201 and Py 207 
in their sophomore year and Py 301 in their junior year. In their senior 
year they may elect Py 303, Sy302, or a fuU-year course in the history of 
philosophy (either Py 305-306 or Py 405-406). AU transfer students are 
required to take Py 201 and Py 207, as well as the upper division courses. 

Theology 

Twelve hours of theology are required of all students — one course in 
each of the four years. For Catholic students the required sequence is Ty 
101, Ty 201, Ty 301, and Ty 401. Protestant students may elect their 
sequences. 

[16 [ 



Science and Mathematics 

In general, students will find it to their advantage to take one full-year 
course in the biological sciences, one full-year course in the physical sciences, 
and a trimester course in mathematics. However, a student may by reason 
of his interest, and goals, and previous achievement vary this almost to suit 
himself. He is required to satisfy only six hours in the lower division. 

Art and Music 

A student is required to take either three hours in art and six hours in 
music or vice versa. If he has a strong background in art, he wiU be en- 
couraged to take six hours in art. However, the choice rests with him. At 
least one course in each is required in the lower division. 

Social Science 

Two full-year courses — twelve hours — are required of all students. 
It is desirable that they take these courses in the freshman and sophomore 
years, especially if they plan to concentrate in the area of social science. 

All students are required to take Sse 101-102 — Basic Social Science. In 
the second year they have a variety of choices: Hy 201-202 — American 
History; Es 201-202 — Basic Economics; Hy 203-204 — World Civilization; 
Pel 201-202 — American National, State, and Local Government; Sse 202-202 — 
Great Masterpieces of Social, Economic, and Political Thought; or Sy 201-202 — 
Sociological Foundations of Modern Life and Problems of American Society. The 
student should choose his second year of social science with a view to a 
possible concentration or to the strengthening of his general education. 

Literature 

One full-year course in literature is required of all students. Here again 
the student has a range of choice: Eh 201-202 — English Literature; Eh 203- 
204 — World Literature; Eh 205-206 — The Short Story and the Novel; Eh 207- 
208 — Enjoyment of Literature Through Drama; Eh 213-214 — Great Books: 
Non-Fiction. 

Foreign Language 

Each student is required to acquire oral-aural mastery of a modem lan- 
guage. Students with high qualitative proficiency in a foreign language 
may apply for a waiver from this requirement. They then may continue 
advanced study in the language as an elective or as a concentration; or they 
may elect to study another foreign language; or they may terminate their 
study of foreign language. Students may choose to meet this requirement 
by summer study abroad or in approved summer institutes. 

[17] 



General Seminar 

Each student is required to participate each trimester in a small discussion 
group which meets weekly after each general assembly of the student body 
or after each coUegewide lecture which all students must attend. Each 
discussion group is composed of students from each of the four classes — 
freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior. To each discussion group faculty 
counselors are assigned. One hour credit is given for the General Seminar 
each semester. Six of the eight credits are counted in the basic program, the 
other two can be counted among the electives. The General Seminar is one 
of the integrative forces of the basic or core program. 

Criteria for Choice 

As may be seen from the foregoing descriptions, provision for electives 
within the requirements of the basic or core program is extensive. As 
students plan their programs with the help of their advisors, they should note 
the range of possibilities open to them and make their choices only after 
having considered the following: 

1. Relation of the course (elective) to their immediate needs and interests 

2. Relation of the course (elective) to their long-range goals 

3. Relation of the course (elective) to building up their background and 
extending their intellectual horizons 

4. Relation of the course to new interests 

5. Relation of the course to a possible concentration. 

FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

During the freshman year the student has the opportunity to discover, to 
test, and to extend his interests in the fields of knowledge included in the 
basic program. By the end of that year he selects tentatively an area of 
concentration most closely related to his goals. He then plans his program 
for the sophomore year, including in it both the basic required courses and 
courses in his tentative field of concentration. By the end of the sophomore 
year and before admission into the upper division, he must choose his field 
of concentration finally. He cannot alter it thereafter without extending the 
time necessary to complete his four-year program. Through counseling and 
evaluation, the College helps him to make a realistic choice and to plan his 
program for the upper division. He himself with the assistance of this counsel- 
ing designs the program he will follow in his chosen concentration. Speci- 
fically, credit hours are distributed as follows in a minimal degree program: 
Basic or Core courses .... 84 credit hours 
Concentration courses ... 36 credit hours 

[18] 



Electives 12 credit hours 

Total 132 credit hours 

As the student advances upward in his four-year program, fewer courses 
are required and more courses are chosen by him. Since the student may 
choose electives closely related to, or actually within, the division of his 
concentration, his concentration may total 48 credit hours, even in the 
minimal degree requirements. 

Student objectives and purposes differ from person to person both as to 
the direction of thinking and action as well as to the breadth of approach. 
Saint Leo College recognizes this and helps the student so to tailor his pro- 
gram, within the framework of the total program of studies, that he may 
pursue his route to becoming the educated man v/ith maximal and optimal 
use of the opportunities provided. Moreover, if he is anticipating entering a 
profession such as medicine, dentistry, lav/, teaching, business or one of the 
social services such as social worker, librarian, or the Peace Corps, the College 
helps him to plan his concentration so as to assure him of a broad base of 
liberal education upon which his specialized training in graduate school or in 
special training school can rest solidly. Thus it is that flexibility in planning 
the concentration enables the student to progress toward the achievement of 
his goals — both personal and vocational. 

Structurally, the subject areas included in the academic program of Saint 
Leo College fall within one of the five divisions: 

1. Philosophy, Theology, and Education 

2. Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

3. Literature and Language 

4. Social Sciences 

5. Art and Music. 
A concentration may: 

1. Cut across all five divisions 

2. Cut across several divisions 

3. Be confined to one division 

4. Be confined to one area within a division. 

For example, a student, discovering in his freshman or sophomore year 
relationships meaningful to him in all the areas represented in the basic pro- 
gram may seek to develop even greater awareness of, and sensitivity to, all 
the areas of knowledge. His concentration would be therefore in the liberal 
arts and sciences and would cut across the five divisions of the academic 
program. 

Another student may find his interests and purposes centered in several 
areas of knowledge. He, too, would have a cross divisional concentration. It 

[19] 



might be, for example, in literature and language and one of the social 
sciences, or in the biological sciences and the social sciences. Still another 
student may wish to concentrate fully in one field of knowledge; he would 
have a divisional approach, say in philosophy, or in literature, or in art. 
Finally because of vocational desire, a student may wish to concentrate with- 
in one field of knowledge. His choice may be to view reality through the 
eyes of the educated mathematician, the chemist, the linguist, the economist, 
the historian, the artist, the teacher of a selected subject, the musician, the 
man of business. The opportunity is there; he has only to explore it, to 
seize it, and to set about achieving it systematically and confidently. 

Planning the Concentrations 

As one may see from a careful study of the basic or core program (cf. 
especially "criteria for choice", p. 18), from the beginning of his freshman 
year the student is extending his intellectual horizon, testing his interests, 
and moving toward his final choice of a concentration. The basic required 
courses lay the foundation; his choice within required areas helps him to dis- 
cover and to test his interests. Together they help him to develop the 
background necessary for competent work in his concentration. 

Among the kinds of questions he should ask himself and discuss with his 
advisor as he plans his program are the following: 

1. What do I want to make of my life? 

2. What opportunities do the total program of Saint Leo College and 
more particularly the academic program offer me? 

3. What are my personal, social, and intellectual assets at this time? 

4. In what particular areas do I need strengthening before I can move 
onward with confidence? 

5. Does any particular lack keep me from feeling that I can or should enter 
any particular field of concentration? Why? Can I overcome this? 
How? 

It is not to be expected that the student can answer these questions satis- 
factorily in one counseling session, nor even in several. For that reason he 
is given the two-year period of the lower division in which to savor the 
offerings in each division of knowledge, to develop a strong base of general 
education, to test his interests and his goal, to evaluate his development, to 
develop a social outlook, and finally at the end of his sophomore year to 
choose his concentration. The College provides many services and resources 
to aid him in his development and in his choice. 

[20] 



FLEXIBILITY 

Since Saint Leo College is committed to assisting each of its students to 
develop his full potential as a person created to the image of God, it accepts 
responsibly the fact that individual students differ in background, motiva- 
tion, purpose, goals. By providing for flexibility in several aspects of the 
academic program, it attempts to meet the challenge of liberally educating 
each of its students. 

In addition to the flexibility implicit in the design of the basic or core 
program and in the choice and design of the concentrations as described 
above, five other kinds of flexibility characterize the academic program: 

1. The individual teacher's approach to, and organization of, instruction 
in the subject for which he is responsible 

2. Directed Reading — a required course at the junior level 

3. Individual Work — a course open to juniors and seniors 

4. Independent Study 

5. Extended Time. 

The Teacher's Approach 

Each teacher has his own way of instructing. To the extent that he knows 
his subject field, sees its many relations to other fields of knowledge, under- 
stands his students and their particular ways of viewing his subject and 
developing understanding of it, and cares about their development, to that 
extent he will use his creativeness in his role as instructor — their instructor. 
Thus, flexibility will characterize his approach, since each student will differ 
in some way from the other students in the class. 

Saint Leo CoUege accords each faculty member freedom to develop his own 
instructional procedures within the framework of the function of the course, 
the general syllabus provided for the area, and the expectation that each 
student in the class will be developing under his guidance. 

Directed Reading 

Required at the junior level in aU fields of concentration is a course desig- 
nated 330 — Directed Reading in the field (biology, chemistry, physics, 
economics, history, etc.). The course carries variable credit — 3 to 6 hours. 
Its function primarily is to develop or to strengthen the background of the 
individual students who are beginning their concentrations in the field. 
Three criteria govern the selection of the readings assigned for study and 
discussion: 

1. The stage of the individual student's development in the field 

2. The pertinence of the selection to basic knowledge in the field 

3. The stimulation offered for further inquiry and discovery. 

[21] 



In this course, the student is given help in understanding technical terms and 
procedures and in extending his background through independent re- 
search. He receives direction for study from the instructor. He shares his 
reading with other students and is enriched thereby. He is encouraged to 
begin to acquire his personal library in the field of his concentration. Since 
this course is co-requisite with other courses in his concentration, its intellec- 
tual returns are felt immediately, thus strengthening his study of his con- 
centration. In brief, the function of the course is to open up vistas for each 
student, not to stifle enthusiasm for the subject. The vistas may vary. 

Individual Work 

Open to juniors and seniors is a course designated 430 — Individual Work 
in a field (history, sociology, biology, etc.). The course is designed to 
provide a competent student who has the approval of his area chairman 
with the opportunity for guided intensive independent research or study of a 
selected phase or problem relevant to his purpose or interest. The course 
carries variable credit — 3 to 6 hours. Through Individual Work, a student 
may either extend the scope of his concentration or deepen it. Individual 
Work varies as the need and purpose of each student undertaking it vary. 

Independent Study 

One of the distinguishing characteristics of the educated person is his 
ability (and one might add his habit) to pursue the study of a problem, 
question, topic, or subject independently to his own satisfaction or to meet 
the requirements of a goal he has set. Grades of A in the normal class, 
provision for the waiver of certain required courses, honors courses and 
programs all imply independent study of high quality. 

Extended Time 

Saint Leo CoUege is dedicated to the task of educating young men and 
women, not to punishing them. It recognizes that each person progresses at 
his own rate in the acquiring of meaning and significance of material studied. 
Therefore, when a student, having met specified criteria (cf. p. 00), requires 
more time to master certain materials and give evidence of his mastery by 
examination than the regular schedule calls for, he is granted extended time. 
The length of the period of extended time will vary as the situations for 
which it is being granted vary. 

SEMINARS 

Each student participates in three kinds of seminars as part of his required 
academic work: 

[22] 



1. The General Seminar described above 

2. The Lecture-Seminar 

3. The Divisional Senior Seminar. 

These seminars serve, each in a particular way, as integrating forces. They 
assist the student to discover relationships among the fields of knowledge — 
insights new to him — to re-interpret meanings, and to perceive deeper 
significance in his studies. They assist the College to present knowledge 
as unified, whole, active, and developing. 

The Lecture-Seminars 

An integral part of the academic program is the college-wide lecture- 
seminar. On the average of once a month a guest lecturer distinguished 
nationally and internationally for his or her achievement, vision, and leader- 
ship in some field of knowledge and endeavor is invited for a period of two 
days to give two lectures. Each lecture is followed by small discussion groups 
in which the seminal ideas of the lectures are discussed, issues are raised, and 
questions for the lecturer to answer are formulated. In a general assembly 
following the seminars, the questions are presented by the secretary of each 
group to the lecturer. In answering the questions he notes imphcations, 
Varying points of view, and significance for further study. During the 
two-day period, the lecturer is available to individual students and small 
groups for interviews. In the course of the academic year, at least one lecture 
is representative of an area included in each of the five divisions of the 
academic program. 

The purpose of the lecture-seminar is manifold. Among the values it 
aims to achieve are the following: 

1. To extend each student's intellectual horizon 

2. To increase his awareness of, and sensitivity to, the worth and dignity 
of his fellow-students 

3. To provide abundant experience in effectual group discussion of signi- 
ficant ideas 

4. To develop each student's powers to communicate 

5. To foster the continuing dialogue 

6. To develop and to strengthen the awareness of the unity of knowledge. 

The Divisional Senior Seminar 

Required of all seniors is the full-year divisional senior seminar. Struc- 
turally, the senior seminar is divisional in that all seniors concentrating in 
areas included in a division participate in it for a three-hour period twice a 
month. It is also area-wide in that all seniors concentrating in a given area 
participate in a three-hour seminar twice each month. The divisional and 
the area-wide section of the seminar meet alternately. 

[23] 



The divisional chairman, the area chairman, and the chairman of the 
students' particular concentrations cooperatively structure the seminars and 
guide the development. Their responsibility is so to plan cooperatively and 
so to guide the development of the seminars and the students' participation 
and contributions to them that the purpose for v^hich the seminars are in- 
cluded and required in the academic program is achieved. 

Both the divisional and the area-wide seminars are unifying in nature. 
They assist the students to order and to integrate v^ith greater clarity the 
knowledge they have acquired thus far in all of their courses — both required 
and elective. They assist them also to increase their awareness of comparable 
insights shared by other students in the division and the areas thereby sharpen- 
ing and deepening their communicative power. Through the discussion of 
problems, issues, and the challenge of research under the leadership of the 
responsible professors, the seminars serve as an inspiring testing ground both 
for further inquiry and study and for the clarification of one's personal 
philosophy of living the good life. 

THE COMPREHENSIVES 

The comprehensive examinations required of each student toward the 
end of his sophomore and his senior years are an integral part of the academic 
program. Based on the assumption of the unity of all knowledge and on the 
assumption of the uniqueness of the individual person's interior ity and inte- 
grative processes, they serve a two-fold function. They assist the student to 
order, through careful preparation and direction, the knowledge he has 
thus far gleaned from the academic program he has pursued. They also 
assist him to clarify and perhaps to extend, the meanings his knowledge 
has for him in the everyday issues, problems, and personal relations he en- 
counters. Thus, they are, in a constructive sense, an aid to self examination 
and evaluation. 

The Sophomore Comprehensive 

Toward the end of his sophomore year, each student expecting to be 
awarded either the Associate of Arts degree or to be admitted into the upper 
division of the College must take a comprehensive examination part of 
which is written, part of which is oral. This examination is designed speci- 
fically (1) to assist the student to evaluate his achievement in the basic or 
core program and to determine his field of concentration in the upper 
division; (2) to evaluate his social and emotional maturity, giving evidence 
of his ability to pursue upper division work with increasing self direction; 
and (3) to determine areas of strengths and weaknesses which should be 
considered as he plans his upper division work. 

[241 



The Senior Comprehensive 

Toward the end of the senior year, each candidate for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts is required to take the senior com- 
prehensive examination. The v^ritten examination has two sections. The 
first is designed to test the student's grasp of the content of the basic or core 
subjects; the second, his grasp of his field of concentration. The oral exami- 
nation is focused upon the extent to which he has integrated his field of 
concentration with other areas and is able to relate his knowledge to values 
implicit in philosophy and Christian theology. 

The purpose of the senior comprehensive is threefold: (1) to assist the 
student to evaluate his readiness for graduate work or specialized technical 
training in his chosen field; (2) to assist the student to discover his strengths 
and weaknesses and to plan his advanced studies realistically, i.e. with greater 
knowledge of himself and his achievement; and (3) to serve as one criterion 
for the awarding of honors. 



[25] 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 



At the heart of the educational process should be the discovery and the 
development of permanent worthv/hile values by which men can live ade- 
quate lives. The study and pursuit of these values — the learning about and 
the acquiring of — is not a one-time afiair to be relegated to some one class 
or person. Rather, this study and pursuit must be continuous and must be a 
part of all activities which interpret the program. It is not expected that 
students will always perceive the relationships of life values through their 
engagement in various actitivites The relationships should be there, however, 
and should be discoverable by the students through their own experiences 
in the program. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Saint Leo College is a Catholic institution; it also welcomes students of 
other rehgious behefs who may wish to attend. Philosophy and theology are 
basic to the Christian College; therefore, every student is required to take 
courses in philosophy and theology as part of the general program of studies. 

Catholic students are encouraged to attend Mass daily and receive the 
sacraments frequently. Efforts are made to help them develop those qualities 
of Catholic leadership which will make them useful members of their home 
parishes. A spiritual retreat is held each year and all Catholic students are 
expected to participate. A special college Mass is offered every Sunday morn- 
ing for aU college students on the campus. Mass is offered daily in the Abbey 
Church and in Roderick Hall. 

Non-Catholic students are encouraged to attend services in nearby Dade 
City. Transportation is available for those wishing to do so. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Saint Leo has a friendly spirit fostered by the close association characteris- 
tic of the small college. Frequent formal and informal social functions are 
held during the academic year. Movies are shown each weekend. 

Students are encouraged to participate in the various cultural offerings 
both at Saint Leo College and at nearby colleges and cities. Throughout the 
year concerts, lectures, and plays are available. The College ordinarily pro- 
vides free transportation to those activities which are offered outside of 
Saint Leo College. 

[26] 



STUDENT SERVICE 

As outlined previously (c£ page 00), Student Service is a practical concept 
that arises from the truly Christian and Benedictine tradition. Underscoring 
the inherent dignity of human activity, it brings this activity into focus in 
each student's life v^^ith the hope each will discover greater significance in 
social concern. Such service forms a part of the living student endowment 
to the other students and to the College. The services rendered are as broad 
as the needs of the College and the students dictate. 

The concept of service is integral to the total program. Each student 
therefore, upon application indicates his willingness to join in this aspect 
of Benedictine family undertaking. 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Through the various campus organizations and the several publications, 
aU students have the opportunity to express themselves responsibly, to cul- 
tivate their particular interests, and to form close friendships. 

Student Government 

All students become members of the Student Government Association 
upon registration. As a segment of the political society in which we live, 
college students are given the opportunity to learn and to exercise the pro- 
cedures of the larger society by means of this Association. Consequently, 
all students have their share (at least indirectly) in shaping their environ- 
ment and debating the issues of the day. 

The Student Council, with its members chosen by the vote of all the 
students, is the legislative branch of student government for Saint Leo 
College. It is organized to promote the general welfare of the student body. 

It assists in the organization, regulation, and coordination of clubs and other 
student groups. It has been particularly effective in various activities on the 
campus. Under the auspices of the Student Council, the following groups 
have thus far been organized: 

Lambda Pi Omicron (Lepanto): The society for Catholic Action on 
campus 

Phi Sigma Phi (The Greek Forum): a society for philosophical discussion 
of current affairs 

Pi Delta Sigma (Honor Society): a society made up of those whose 
scholastic achievement is considerably above average who are committed not 
only to improving their own scholarship but also to contributing to the in- 
tellectual life of the College 

[27] 



Alpha Sigma: a social and service group with membership Hmited to 
women students 

Kappa Alpha Sigma: a society dedicated to the ideals of Southern gentle- 
men 

Phi Theta Chi: a society to promote the spiritual, social, and mental well- 
being of its members 

The Speech Club: devoted to furthering the knowledge and application 
of the techniques and principles of public speaking 

Business Forum: a club for the discussion of business subjects and careers 
in the business world 

Gun Club: dedicated to the promotion of good sportsmanship and the 
safe handling of firearms in this field of recreation. 

Student Publications 

The College encourages responsibly free expression through its sponsor- 
ship of several publications. 

The Student Union: the bi-weekly student news medium and the organ of 
student opinion 

The Golden Legend: the student yearbook of memorable happenings 

The Encounter: the occasional literary magazine 

The Student Handbook: prepared annually to give students requisite 
detailed information and regulations 

The Alumnus: the news medium for former students 

The News Report: tells of the happenings in the Abbey and College for 
friends of Saint Leo. 

Eligibility Rule 

Officers of student organizations, staffs of college publications, and stu- 
dents participating in public collegiate performances or contests, academic 
or athletic, are subject to the following rule: in addition to passing all courses, 
they must maintain an average of C and be free from official censure of any 
kind. 

THE ATHLETIC AND RECREATIONAL PROGRAM 

Saint Leo College is committed to the education of the whole man and the 
whole woman. To that education athletics and recreation make their special 
contribution. 

Physical Fitness 

During the first year in attendance each student will participate in the 
classes in physical fitness. 

[28] 



Varsity Sports 

Saint Leo College has an active varsity program in basketball, baseball, 
tennis, track, and golf. 

Intramurals 

This program includes football, basketball, volleyball, softball, tennis, 
golf, and w^ater sports. All students participate in the intramural program 
unless they are members of a varsity team. 

Recreation Facilities 

Recreation is provided on campus by: 

The Recreation Hall 

The McDonald Center 

The Lakefront 

A nine-hole golf course 

Track, ball diamonds, tennis and handball courts 

Movies each weekend 

Other entertainment (through local and visiting performers). 



REMINDERS FROM THE STUDENT HANDBOOK 

A few items selected from the Student Handbook are particularly note- 
worthy and useful for the student applying for admission to the College. 
They are noted below. 

Clothing and Personal Items 

The College does not prescribe dress except to emphasize that students 
accept reasonable standards of decorum. Therefore, the articles of apparel 
follow the conventional standards for church, social affairs, home, and 
sports. They should be in sufficient quantity to allow for change. 

A desk lamp, alarm clock, bed linens, and towels are necessary items. 

Automobiles 

Under the current policy incoming resident freshmen are not permitted 
to possess or to use an automobile. At the beginning of the second trimester 
students are allowed the privilege provided they have attained a minimum 
average of 2.5 during the first trimester. The privilege continues thereafter 
as long as a student maintains such average and complies with the driving 
regulations as published in the Student Handbook. The College assumes no 
responsibility for the safety of cars. 

[29] 



Resident Students 



Saint Leo is primarily a resident-student college with its program and 
facilities coordinated to this end. All students, therefore, reside in the resi- 
dences provided unless they are of local families or are staying with relati\ es. 
Students share the responsibility of tidiness and neatness and agree to the 
arrangements necessary for harmonious cooperative living. 



[30] 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

ADMISSIONS 
Admissions Requirements and Procedures 

The admission policy of Saint Leo College is governed by the general 
principle that the student who applies and is accepted possesses the ability to 
do college-level work and has the desire to attend Saint Leo College. To 
enable the Admissions Committee to arrive at a decision, the apphcant should: 

1. Complete the application blank and attach the $10.00 application fee 

2. Request the principal of his high school to forward a transcript of the 
high school record 

3. Request a recommendation from a high school teacher or guidance 
counselor 

4. Request a letter of recommendation from his pastor 

5. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board, Post Office Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey, and have the 
scores forwarded to Saint Leo College 

6. Submit the College Medical Report. 

The apphcant's credentials are evaluated, and he is notified of admission 
to the incoming freshman class shortly after the Admissions Office has re- 
ceived the information requested above. 

Early Admission 

Saint Leo College will accept candidates for early admission from high 
schools which officially approve of this poHcy and whose programs of 
study are satisfactory. The following conditions for early admission must 
be fulfiUed: 

1. No student will be admitted unless he is highly recommended by the 
principal of the high school. 

2. The College understands that the high school will recommend only 
a student whose achievement in high school has been outstanding. 

3. They are required to take the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test 
and those College Board Achievement Tests which the College has re- 
commended. They will not be considered for early admission unless 
the test scores are satisfactory. Satisfactory will mean a score of better 
than 600 on the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Tests and scores of 
better than 500 on the Achievement Tests of the College Board. 

4. They will be accepted at the end of their third year of high school. 

5. These students will be classified as regular students of the freshman 
year. Full college credit is allowed only at the completion of lower 
division studies. 

[31] 



College Board Advanced Placement Program 

One of the aims of our plan of basic studies is to prevent v^asteful duplica- 
tion of courses. Therefore, Saint Leo College invites applications from stu- 
dents who have taken College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. 
The College v^ill evaluate the results of these tests w^ith the possibility of 
offering both college credit and advanced placement. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

A student w^ishing to transfer from an accredited college should apply in 
v^^riting and should have sent to the Admissions Office: 

1. An official transcript of his high school record if he has had less than 
two years of college work 

2. An official transcript of courses taken at each institution which he has 
attended, with a statement of honorable dismissal and of satisfactory 
academic standing for each 

3. Results of C.E.E.B. Aptitude Tests 

4. A copy of the catalogue of each institution attended, with notation of 
courses taken. 

Only courses which correspond to, or are similar to, those offered at Saint 
Leo College and in which the student has earned a grade of C or better are 
considered for transfer. Ordinarily, the transfer credits granted do not 
exceed credits given for similar courses at Saint Leo College. An evaluation 
of maximum transferable credits is made at the time of the student's accep- 
tance. Acceptance of admission by the transfer student is regarded as ac- 
ceptance of the evaluation of credits for transfer. No further action may be 
requested at a later date. 

Transfer students must meet ail residence, grade, and credit requirements 
if they expect to graduate from Saint Leo College. They will not ordinarily 
be accepted into Upper Division studies until they have honored the require- 
ments of the Lower Division. Generally, this will mean at least a trimester 
of residence or until the essential lower divisional studies have been com- 
pleted satisfactorially. 

Admission as a Special Student 

A student who wishes to enroll for courses without being a candidate for a 
degree may be admitted as a special or an unclassified student provided he 
meets the regular entrance requirements and proves himself qualified to 
pursue the studies concerned. A special student is subject to the same academic 
regulations and discipline as other students. However, he is given no class 
rating and is not eligible for academic honors. He is charged for courses at 

[32] 



the rate of $25.00 per credit hour, plus any special fees related to his 
particular courses. Students taking less than twelve credits are classified as 
special students. 

ACADEMIC STATUS 

The Grading System 

The following grading system is used at Saint Leo College: 

A — Excellent I — Incomplete (will be marked failure if 

B — Good condition not complete in the 

C — Fair following trimester.) 

E — Extended time 

D — Poor, but passing WP — Withdrew passing 

F — Failure WF — Withdrew failing 

Grade Interpretations 

Grade A is reserved for work that is exceptional in quality, for work 
showing keen insight, understanding, and initiative well beyond the re- 
quirements of the course. This grade cannot be earned solely by conscien- 
tious preparation of assigned work or by high grades on tests. 

Grade B is given for work that is consistently superior, for work that shows 
interest, effort or originality that lifts it well above the average. Conscien- 
tious preparation of assigned work alone does not merit B ; the grade is a 
recognition of quality. 

Grade C is a respectable grade. It is the minimum grade required for 
graduation. It assumes regular attendance at class, punctuality, consistent 
preparation of work day by day, and completion in a satisfactory manner of 
all work required for the course. 

Grade D indicates below average work, which is passing but below the 
standard level required. 

Grade F indicates complete failure. 

Grade E Extended time. 

Extended Time 

The student who has shown himself to be serious in the pursuit of know- 
ledge but unable to maintain fuJly the pace required will be granted time up 
to an extra trimester to meet the norms for a satisfactory grade. The normal 
requirements for this privilege are: 

1. He must have attended all class sessions (except for definite illness). 

2. He must have participated as well as he is able. 

3. He must have performed all extra-class assignments. This means spend- 
ing no less than two hours for each hour of class time. 

[33] 



Added to these (based on the assumption that he recognizes his weakness 
in the area) are: 

1. He must have attended all group-counseling sessions and arranged for at 
least three private ones aimed at strengthening his knowledge and 
understanding of the subject. 

2. He must have made use of his workshop privilege regularly. 

3. He must present a written request through his advisor and his instructor. 

Quality Points 

Quality points are assigned as follows: 

A — 4 quality points per credit hour; B — 3 quality points per credit hour; 

C — 2 quality points per credit hour; D — 1 quality point per credit hour. 

The honor point average of a student is defined as the ratio of the total 
number of quality points to the total number of credit hours carried. For 
example, an A in a three credit hour course would earn 12 quality points; 
the honor point average would be 4.0. 

Academic Probation 

The general principle governing all academic decisions is that each student 
is expected to maintain a level of achievement commensurate with his talents. 
Since a cumulative honor point average of C is required for graduation a 
student is ordinarily placed on academic probation if his average jeopardizes 
his normal progress toward eligibility for graduation. This probationary 
period generally continues for a trimester, during which the student is ex- 
pected to carry a normal academic load (16 to 17 hours) and to remedy the 
deficiences for which he was placed on probation. This period may even be 
extended for justifiable reasons, but consideration will not be granted to a 
student who shows evidence of a flagrant neglect of work. 

Academic Suspension 

A student who fails to show adequate evidence of improvement during the 
probationary period will incur academic suspension (for a period of at least 
one trimester), or, if it seems in the best interest of the student and the 
College, dismissal. 

Students who fail more than 50 per cent of the trimester hours attempted or 
pursued during any trimester or session are subject to scholastic suspension 
for one trimester. All such cases will be referred to the Academic Committee 
for decision. When such students re-enter, they are on probation for such 
period as the Academic Committee may deem appropriate. 

Classification of Students 

Saint Leo College requires a minimum of 132 credits for graduation. This 
averages out to 17 credits for each trimester. Some students are able to main- 

[34] 



tain this pace without difficulty. Some may need more time, either by 
attending summer sessions or by an extra trimester. Some leeway is allowed 
in the number of credits required to remain a member of a class. 

Freshman — up to 30 hours in the basic program 

Sophomore — up to 56 hours in the basic program 

Junior — up to 72 hours in the basic program 

Senior — 72 hours up. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Academic Requirements 

To earn the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student 
must: 

1. Complete at least 132 hours of college work 

2. Fulfill the basic program requirements 

3. Complete all the requirements of the degree program of his concen- 
tration 

4. Maintain an overall honor point average of 2.00 

5. Maintain an average of at least C in all courses of his sequence of con- 
centration 

6. Complete successfully the comprehensive examinations 

7. Take the SAT and the Area Tests of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tions. Students who plan to teach must take the National Teacher's Ex- 
amination for certification 

8. Take Physical Education during the first year of attendance. 

Non-Academic 

1. Fulfill the residence requirements 

2. Participate each trimester in the intramural program 

3. Participate each trimester in the Student Service Program 

4. Satisfy all financial obligations 

5. Be present at all graduation functions. 

Residence Requirements 

Four academic years or eight trimesters are ordinarily required to earn the 
Bachelor's degree. Students who transfer from another college must be in 
residence (attendance) at least one full academic year immediately preceding 
their graduation and must earn a minimum of 34 credits in Saint Leo College. 

Exceptions are pre-engineering students who have completed six trimesters 
at Saint Leo College and earned 100 hours of credit. They may transfer to 
an approved engineering college, and upon satisfactory completion of 34 
hours of approved courses, receive a Bachelor's degree from Saint Leo 
College. 

[35] 



The Comprehensive Examinations 

The Sophomore Comprehensive is intended to assist in determining 
whether or not a student is prepared for upper division studies. 

The Senior Comprehensive is intended to measure the student's level of 
achievement during his four years at Saint Leo College; to reveal the quality 
and depth of his understanding, judgment, and expression both in basic 
liberal education and in the area of his concentration. 



HONORS 

The College honors those students who have displayed notable evidence of 
their progress toward becoming educated men or women of character. 

Dean's List 

At the end of each trimester those students who have earned an honor 
point average of 3.25 or better are recognized by placement on the Dean's 
List. Each trimester all on the Dean's List are reviev/ed for signal honor on 
the basis of high quality participation in all phases of campus life. A selected 
number of outstanding students are appointed for membersip in the campus 
Honor Society. 

Graduation with Honor 

Graduation with honor is open to all students who have maintained at 
least a B average throughout their college career. The election to honors 
will be determined by: 

1. The honor point average (as explained below) 

2. The breadth and depth of understanding displayed in Comprehensive 
Examinations 

3. The scores on the Graduate Record Examinations 

4. General evidence of outstanding merit. 
Following these norms, the degree is conferred: 

cum laude upon a student who during his four years at Saint Leo College 
has maintained an average of 3.00 or who during his junior and senior 
years at Saint Leo College has attained an average of 3.50 

magna cum laude upon a student who during his sophomore, junior, and 
senior years at Saint Leo College has attained an average of 3.65 

summa cum laude upon a student who during his four years at Saint Leo 
College has attained an average of 3.80. 

[36] 



Awards 
The following awards are given to members of the graduating class: 

1. The Scholarship Award to the graduating student earning the highest 
scholastic average. He must have attended the full four years. 

2. The John I. Leonard General Excellence Award to the member of the 
graduating class who best embodies the qualities of character, scholarship, 
service, leadership, and general excellence for which Saint Leo stands 

3. The Extra-Curricula r Activities Award to a member of the graduating 
class whose participation and leadership in extra-curricular activities has been 
of the highest order 

4. The IdaWimberly McDonald Award to the resident young woman 
who has rendered outstanding and unselfish service to her fellow students 

5. The Harold A. Heiser Business Award. 

The Floreat Award 

This award is given annually at graduation by the Board of Trustees in 
recognition of distinguished benefaction to Saint Leo and to Catholic edu- 
cation in the State of Florida. 

1961 Right Reverend Monsignor MacEachen, Sarasota, Florida 

1962 Robert A. Brown, Palm Beach, Florida 

1963 Leo N. Hierholzer, Umatilla, Florida 

CHANGE OF REGULATION 

The College reserves the right to make modifications in the degree re- 
quirements, courses, schedules, calendar, regulations, fees and charges, 
deemed necessary or conducive to the efficient operation of the College. 
Such changes become effective from the date they are published in the 
College bulletins. 



[37] 



FINANCIAL REGULATIONS 



TUITION AND FEES 

Expenses 

The comprehensive fee for resident students at Saint Leo College is 
$825.00 a trimester or $1650.00 a year. This includes tuition, lodging, board, 
laundry service, infirmary services, accident insurance, on-campus enter- 
tainment, student publications, campus clubs and activities, matriculation 
and library fees. 

The comprehensive fee for day students at Saint Leo College is $350.00 
a trimester or $700.00 a year for full-time students. This includes tuition, 
library fee, on-campus entertainment, student publications, and campus 
clubs and activities. Charges to part-time day students are on the basis of 
credit hours taken. 

Fees 



ihoratory Fees 


General Fees 


Botany . . $5.00 
Chemistry . 5.00 
Genetics . . 5.00 
Physics . . . 5.00 


Application (not refundable) . . . $10.00 

Room Deposit 50.00 

Fees per credit hour (for those taking 
over 19 hours and for special students 25.00 


Typing ... 5.00 


Library Fees for special students . ' 2.50 


Zoology . . 5.00 


Graduation 20.00 




Transcripts (after first one) ... 1.00 
Deferred Exams: Trimester . . . 3.00 




Mid-trimester . . 2.00 




Announced Test . 1.00 




(This does not include extended time.) 




Late Registration . . . . 5.00 

Change of Program 5.00 

Withdrawal from Class ... 1.00 



Payment of Tuition and Fees 

Payments must be made to the Bursar's Office. Checks are payable to the 
Bursar, or to Saint Leo College. Registration cannot be completed until 
accounts are settled. 

Twenty-five dollars of the $50.00 room deposit fee (which must be paid 
within two weeks after a student is accepted) is not applied to room rent but 

[38] 



is retained to cover any damage beyond reasonable wear which may be done 
to the room or its furnishings while occupied by the student. The balance is 
refunded to the parent when the student withdraws from the College. The 
other $25.00 is credited to the comprehensive fee. In case a student fails to 
occupy the room after reservation, the room deposit will not be refunded. 
Books, supplies, etc, are purchased for cash only. 

Deferred Payment 

All financial arrangements must be completed before a student registers 
for courses. However, day students who are unable to make full payment 
at the time of registration may defer up to 50 per cent until mid-trimester. 
The handling charges will be 2 per cent of all deferred payments. Such special 
arrangements must be made in advance of school opening. 

Those boarding students who are interested in a deferred-payment plan 
may write the Bursar's Office for information concerning the Tuition Plan. 
By this plan, payable in eight monthly installments, many students are en- 
abled to attend college who would otherwise find it impossible. However, 
contracts must be in by August 1. There is a $5.00 handling charge. 

Refund Policy 

It is the responsibility of the individual in case of withdrawal from the 
College to make formal application in writing to the Dean of Academic 
Affairs before any refund of tuition will be made. Any student asked to 
withdraw from the College wiU receive no refunds. Refunds are determined 
not according to the amount already paid, but according to a percent of 
total money payable in the trimester in which the student withdraws. 
Refunds are made on the following basis: 

Within the first week after arrival .... 80 per cent 
One week to two weeks after arrival . . 60 per cent 
Two weeks to three weeks after arrival . . 40 per cent 
Fees are not refundable. 

Financial Responsibility 

No transcripts, letters of recommendation, certificates of attendance, or 
any other official documents will be made available for any student with 
financial indebtedness of any kind to Saint Leo College. 

Personal Property 

The College is not responsible for loss of, or damage to, the personal 
property of students. Ordinarily the insurance coverage of a parent auto- 
matically provides for this or can be extended for this purpose. 

[39] 



FINANCIAL AID 

Scholarships 

The College provides a number of scholarships to worthy students; 
these are awarded on a competitive basis to entering freshmen of out- 
standing promise. Such qualifications as the following are taken into con- 
sideration: scholastic achievement, the College Entrance Examination 
Board scores, need, character, participation in co-curricular activities, 
leadership potential, as well as any special service needed by the College. 
Normally, a personal interview is required. 

Before applying for a scholarship a new student should first make appli- 
cation for admission and then request a scholarship application from the 
Admissions Office. This form, properly executed, should be returned to the 
Committee on Scholarships. Consideration for scholarship aid is given 
only after a student has been admitted. 

A scholarship is a form of bilateral contract. Therefore to hold a scholar- 
ship a student must maintain good standing in the College and a satisfactory 
scholastic record. 

Generally speaking the purpose of the scholarship is to assist students 
whose financial means do not match the scholastic potential they have dis- 
played in their former education. However, there are students who are 
worthy of the scholarship even though they have the resources to finance 
their education. For such students the College is pleased to offer honorary 
scholarships without stipend. 

Funded Scholarships 

St. Charles Borromeo Scholarship. Obtained through gifts from 
friends. Founded in 1895. It is a partial scholarship for deserving students. 
The beneficiary is designated by the Rev. President and the Board of Ad- 
missions. 

The Mary Anne Riley Scholarship. Founded in 1918 by Col. E. R. 
Bradley of Lexington, Kentucky. The selection of the beneficiary is made 
by the Rev. President and the Board of Admissions and is to be based on 
scholarship ability. 

The St. Joseph Scholarship. Founded in 1930 by Miss M. Freihoff of 
Johnstown, Pa. It is open to students for the sacred ministry who feel a call 
to the religious life in the Order of St. Benedict. The beneficiary is designated 
by the Rt. Rev. Chancellor and the Seminary Board. 

The Charlotte R. Campbell Scholarship. Founded in 1952 by the 
request of Charlotte R. Campbell and is open to the students who feel a call 

[40] 



to the religious life as a priest of the Order of St. Benedict. The beneficiary is 
designated by the Rt. Rev. Chancellor and the Seminary Board. 

The Rev. John F. O'Boyle Scholarship. Founded in 1957 by Mr. and Mrs. 
C. P. McCabe for two or more partial scholarships for priesthood students. 

The Patrick and Margaret McCabe Scholarship. Founded in 1960 by 
Mr. and Mrs. C. P. McCabe for a partial scholarship for a deserving student of 
character and ability. 

Loans 

In many instances it is possible to finance college education, at least in 
part, by seeking a loan. Such loans are generally payable over a long period 
of time and enable the parents, or in some instances the student, to finance 
educational needs v^ithout undue hardship. Because funds for outright 
grants are necessarily limited, many students borrow up to $500 per year and 
in some cases a larger amount, as a necessary and honorable link in their 
financial program. Loans are made, however, only to students who need 
fmancial assistance. 

Saint Leo will make loans from our National Defense Loan Fund. Some of 
the important terms are: 

1. No interest is charged until one year from the date the borrower ceases 
to be a full-time student. 

2. No interest is charged during any period not in excess of three years 
that the borrower serves in the Armed Forces. 

3. The loan is to be repaid within 10 years, including 3 per cent interest. 

4. The amount the borrower has to repay will be reduced 10 per cent, 
up to the maximum of 50 per cent, for each year in which he teaches 
in public school. 

Additional loans will be made from our own Student Loan Fund. They 
are also to be repaid within ten years. No interest is charged on these loans 
while a student is enrolled at Saint Leo; 3 per cent for five years after he leaves 
Saint Leo; and 5 per cent thereafter. 

AsSISTANTSfflPS 

The College provides opportunity for a few well quahfied students to 
sponsor part of their finances through assistantships during the years of upper 
division study. 

Veterans Administration 

Veterans and dependents of veterans enrolled at Saint Leo College are 
eligible for training benefits by the Veterans Administration. Those planning 
to attend college should consult the local Veterans Administration Office 

[41] 



before applying for admission and should then follow the regular admission 
procedure. V. A. benefits are paid directly to the student. In order to receive 
payment from the Veterans Administration, the veteran must fill out a special 
form, available at the Office of the Registrar, at the end of each calendar 
month of attendance. Training time is designated by the Veterans Adminis- 
tration for the fall and vvrinter trimesters as follows: 

14 or more semester hours full time 

10-14 semester hours 3-4 time 

7-9 semester hours 1-2 time 

1-6 semester hours less than 1-2 time 



[42] 



PROGRAMS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Saint Leo College is committed to the principle that a broad education 
in the liberal arts fortified by continuous insights into, and application of, 
Christian values is the best basic preparation for a college student. There is 
almost an endless variety of professions and vocations into which a student 
can enter as a result of his basic program in the liberal arts and sciences. 

Many students by reason of need will terminate their formal education 
at the level of the Bachelor's degree. The undergraduate programs offered 
at Saint Leo College are eminently suitable for such persons. Illustrations 
are the programs preparatory to teaching, to a career in business, and to 
social service. 

On the other hand, many students by reason of their ambition and 
talents as well as their financial resources will wish to continue their studies 
in graduate schools. As a matter of fact, practically all professional pro- 
grams are capable of completion only in graduate schools. The period of 
graduate study may vary from one to five years. As a general rule, graduate 
schools will accept students who have done well in their undergraduate 
studies during their four years of attendance. 

What program a student will pursue in Saint Leo College depends then 
on his purpose and goals. He should make sure of his basic or core program 
and choose his concentration with his further educational purposes in mind. 
If a student is desirous of continuing his studies in graduate school, he 
should be thinking early of the school of his choice so that he can fulfill 
as many of the prerequisites of that school as possible. He should also 
make known to his advisor his plans so that educational and vocational 
counseling may be more meaningful. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

The choice of his concentration and the tailoring of it to his purpose 
and goals (within the framework of the College program) are two of the 
most important things that the student does as he enters the upper division. 
Organizationally concentrations are of four kinds (cf. Academic Program): 

1. Selectively cross-divisional over the five divisions of knowledge; e. g., 
a Liberal Arts concentration or an Honors concentration 

2. Selectively cross-divisional over two or more but less than five di- 
visions; e. g., a Humanities concentration or an American Studies con- 
centration 

3. Divisional; e. g., a concentration in Mathematics and Science or Social 
Science 

[43] 



4. Area within a division; e. g., concentration in History or Economics or 
Psychology. 

Approval of the student's plan of concentration must be made by the 
following persons: 

1. Selectively cross-divisional (both kinds) by the Dean of Academic 
Affairs 

2. Divisional by the Chairman of the Division 

3. Area within a division by the Area Chairman. 

Pre-Law 

A broad background of education in the arts and sciences is recognized as 
excellent undergraduate preparation for the prospective lawyer. If it has 
depth as well as breadth, it is superior. The student interested in law should 
examine carefully the opportunities provided in the program of studies of 
Saint Leo College and should plan carefully both his concentration and 
his electives. He may choose from such concentrations (provided, of course, 
his efforts and achievement justify the choice) as Liberal Arts, American 
Studies, or in any one of such fields as history, economics, business, sociology, 
psychology, philosophy, literature and language. He should elect, if he 
has the opportunity, courses required as prerequisites by the individual law 
school he has chosen. 

Pre-Medicine (Dental, Pharmacy, Veterinary) 

The student interested in any way in the medical field should plan his 
basic or core program, taking advantage of the flexibility within, so that 
he is strong enough in mathematics to do well in the sciences, particularly 
in biology and chemistry. His concentration should be in the sciences. 

Pre-Social Service 

The student interested in social work should strengthen his understanding 
of people and his ability to accept and communicate with them. He should 
consider a concentration in sociology or in psychology or a combination 
of both. He should prepare himself sufficiently well in mathematics to 
understand the statistics involved in his concentration. 

Pre-Business (Business Administration) 

The student planning to enter a field of business upon completion of his 
four-year program should explore carefully the field he wishes to enter 
and note the aspects of the field that are subject to change and those of a 
more permanent nature. He should note also the personal qualities needed 
and consider how his college program may help him to develop them. He 

[44] 



might plan a cross-divisioDal concentration in which economics, pohtical 
science, Enghsh, business law, and accounting are fields of study. 

If a student is planning a career in Business Administration, he should 
understand that business administration is usually a graduate field. He should 
prepare for this. His concentration should then be in economics (bolstered 
by adequate competence in statistics) or in a related field. 

Pre-Engineering 

The student interested in engineering should spend at least three years 
with his electives and concentration courses channeled into the fields of 
science and mathematics before transferring to the engineering school of his 
choice. 

Pre-library science 

The student interested in becoming a librarian would do well to include a 
course or two in library science in his program. Library Science is a graduate 
field. However, Saint Leo College provides enough undergraduate courses 
in it to help a student to become a competent assistant in a library. His con- 
centration should be either Liberal Arts or in literature and the social sciences 
unless he has a decided interest in mathematics, science, or language. 

Pre-Teaching 

See Teacher Education Program below. 

Liberal Arts 

The student who wishes to develop more depth in the liberal arts and 
sciences than is assured through the basic or core program should request a 
Liberal Arts concentration. His concentration must include at least one six- 
hour (or two three-hour) sequence at the 300-400 level from each of the 
five divisions plus at least another such sequence and the senior seminar 
of a selected division. 

Honors 

The Honors concentration follows the same pattern as the Liberal Arts 
concentration, but it is limited to superior students. The course work is 
largely seminar and independent study. 

Humanities 

A Humanities concentration draws from four divisions: Theology, Philos- 
ophy, and Education; Literature and Language; Art and Music; and Social 
Science. Its pattern follows, in the main, that of the Liberal Arts concen- 
tration. 

[45] 



American Studies 

A student looking forward to a career in foreign service, to college teach- 
ing in the social sciences or American Literature, to law or merely to depth in 
scholarship should consider a concentration in American Studies provided he 
is an honor student in the lower division. The pattern of this concentration is 
three-fold: (1) it includes any three of the following: art, English, economics, 
government, philosophy, psychology, and theology; (2) the student writes 
an honors thesis, taking courses related to the thesis, presents and defends 
the thesis in his Senior Seminar (last trimester, senior year); and (3) he must 
maintain his honor average throughout the upper division. 

Subject Fields 

The student wishing to concentrate in a specific subject field should 
study the courses offered in Courses of Instruction of this catalogue. Saint 
Leo College provides for concentrations in art, biology, chemistry, econo- 
mics, English, a selected foreign language, history, mathematics, physics, 
political science, philosophy, psychology, social science, and sociology. 

Deciding 

The student should study the courses offered, their prerequisites, and the 
basic offerings in the core program related to his proposed concentration. 
He should seek proper counseling before he makes his final decision. 

The student of average background is expected to take courses com- 
mensurate with his standing in the College. However, the principles of 
flexibility which undergird the program permit courses to be open to 
any student who shows the proper qualifications. 

It is wise for the entering student to bear in mind the plan of the College 
in reference to class standing: freshman — up to 30 hours in the basic program; 
sophomore — up to 56 hours in the basic program; junior — up to 72 hours 
in the basic program; senior — above 72. 

The catalogue attempts to spell out concentrations as they are foreseen 
during the first years of upper division at Saint Leo. The College reserves the 
right to cancel courses for which there is insufficient registration. However, 
every effort will be made to fulfill the college commitments. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The secondary teacher education program of Saint Leo CoUege has been 
approved by the State Department of Education. The student interested in 
teaching in secondary schools — both junior and senior high schools — may 
prepare himself by centering his concentration upon the fields he wishes to 
teach and by taking sufficient courses in education to enable him to teach 

[46] 



for at least a short while before going to graduate school. It should be borne 
in mind that teaching is a profession and like all professions requires graduate 
study for one to be adequately qualified. 

Teaching fields for which Saint Leo College provides are biology, chem- 
istry, physics, general business-accounting-economics, history, history- 
political science, mathematics, art, psychology-sociology, English, French, 
Spanish, German, economics-sociology, physical education. It is possible to 
plan for other combinations. 

For the student wishing to prepare to be an elementary teacher, arrange- 
ments can be made for him to take necessary courses not provided by Saint 
Leo College in an approved college or university. 

Approval of the teacher education program of a student is the responsi- 
bility of the Area Chairman (education), the Area Chairman of the selected 
field, and the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

NUMBERING OF COURSES 

Lower division courses are numbered 100-299. Those numbered 100-199 
are normally freshman courses; those numbered 200-299, sophomore. Upper 
division courses are numbered 300-400. Normally, these are available only 
to those who have completed the requirement for admission to upper divi- 
sion study. 

None of the 100 level courses may be used for fulfilling the 36 hours 
required in each of the concentrations. Such courses may be used, however, 
to complete the number of electives. As many as 12 hours of 200 level 
courses may be used in some areas of concentration. 

Courses 330 (Directed Reading), 430 (IndividualWork) , and 499 (Divisional 
Senior Seminar) are required in every area of concentration except Art. 

Courses numbered 410 are internship courses; e.g.. En 410, Sy 410. 

Courses numbered 450 are field experience courses; e. g., Bsn 450. 

Courses may extend through one or two trimesters. Odd-numbered 
courses standing alone are one-trimester courses; courses with hyphenated 
number, e.g., 201-202, are intended as a sequence and should be planned 
as a unit of study. In some cases a student may take one or the other part of a 
sequence for credit. In sequence courses the odd-numbered part is generally 
in the first trimester. 

Abbreviations 

Acg — Accounting 

Aty — Astronomy 

Bly — Biology 

Bsn — Business Administration 

[47] 



Ce - 


- Chinese 


Cy - 


- Chemistry 


Es - 


- Economics 


En - 


- Education 


Eg - 


- Engineering 


Eh - 


- English 


Fie - 


- Foreign Language 


Fh - 


- French 


Gn - 


- German 


Gsr - 


- General Seminar 


Hy - 


- History 


Hs - 


- Humanities 


Ms - 


- Mathematics 


Mc - 


- Music 


Py - 


- Philosophy 


PhEn- 


- Physical Education 


Ps - 


- Physics 


Pel - 


- Political Science 


Psy - 


- Psychology 


Sh - 


- Spanish 


Sse - 


- Social Science 


Sy - 


- Sociology 


Ty - 


- Theology 


Not Abbreviated 


Art 




Library 


Science 


Typewriting 


Foreign Language 



Saint Leo College requires each student who seeks to graduate with the 
Bachelor's degree to acquire mastery of a modern foreign language to the 
extent of engaging easily in conversation. This implies oral-aural skills and 
facile use of the idioms of the selected language. Three trimesters permitting 
students approximately 500 contact hours in laboratory and class with the 
selected language, are devoted to simple mastery. It is expected that some 
students will acquire the mastery (or already have it) in less time. Courses in 
the selected language, thereafter, are conducted in the language, and are 
directed toward increasing knowledge and appreciation of the hterature and 
life of the people whose language is being studied. 

Students who concentrate in a foreign language are expected to study 
abroad for at least one trimester. 

[48] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



ACCOUNTING 

Acg 201 — Elementary Accounting 3 credits 

The basic principles of accounting and their application in the analysis 
and recording of transactions: trial balance, work sheet, profit and loss 
statement, balance sheet, introduction to corporation accounting. 

Acg 202 — Elementary Accounting 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Acg 201. Accounting for different equity structures and 
for cost reporting and control. Intensive analysis of reports and 
statements. 

ART 

Art 101 — Introduction to Art 3 credits 

Required. A study of esthetic experience, its characteristics, and sig- 
nificance; the principles of art; the criteria of esthetic judgment. The 
aims are several: the cultural, to develop an understanding of art as 
a fundamental expression of man; the practical, to develop artistic 
judgment for use in daily hving; and the creative, to provide inspira- 
tion and encouragement to the developing artist. 

Art 201-202 — Two and Three Dimensional Design 3 to 6 credits 

An experimental approach to painting and the graphic arts through 
form, color, and texture; and to sculpture and architecture in relation 
to space, light, motion, and structural principle. 

Art 203-204 — Drawing 2 to 6 credits 

Freehand drawing from objects. Training to see, to understand, and 
to draw. Emphasis on "visual report." 

Art 205-206 — Ceramics 3 to 6 credits 

The making of forms in clay. Manual and wheel techniques. Research 
and experimental analysis of glazes on various clay bodies. Clay in 
the field of sculpture. 

[491 



Art 301-302 — Art Studio I 2 to 8 credits 

Prerequisites: Art 101, 201-202, or equivalent, and approval of area 
chairman. Individual development according to talent in one of the 
following fields: architecture; painting; sculpture; stained glass; the 
crafts. 

Art 303-304 — Advanced Drawing - 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Art 203-204 or equivalent and approval of area chair- 
man. Drawing from live models. 

Art 401-402 — Art Studio II 2 to 8 credits 

Prerequisites: Art 301-302 and approval of area chariman. Continua- 
tion of individual development. 

Art 411-412 — History of Art 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours in art and the approval of area chairman. 
Analysis of the cultural development of mankind from earliest times 
as reflected in painting, architecture, and sculpture. The organic 
growth of living tradition from germinal ideas and values. Emphasis 
on the authentic Christian tradition in sacred art. Relation of art to 
all fields of knowledge. 

Art 499 — Senior Seminar in the Arts 6 credits 

Required of all seniors concentrating in the arts. 

ASTRONOMY 

Aty 101 — Descriptive Astronomy 3 credits 

An elementary survey of the astronomical universe, primarily for 
students not planning to concentrate in the physical sciences and 
mathematics. Includes observational work and satisfies requirement 
for a laboratory science. 

Aty 301 — General Astronomy 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six hours of college physics and approval of area chair- 
man. A survey of the astronomical universe, primarily for students 
concentrating in physics and mathematics. Includes observational 
work. 

[SO] 



Aty 430 — Individual Work in Astronomy 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Aty 301 or twelve yours of college physics and approval 
of area chairman. Designed to enable the student to pursue a topic 
or problem in astronomy related to his particular interest. 

BIOLOGY 

Bly 101 — General Botany 4 credits 

Prerequisites: High school or college chemistry or physics or Ps 103- 
104 and approval of area chairman. A general study of the basic 
principles of plant morphology and physiology, together with a 
systematic survey of the plant kingdom. The evolution, the distri- 
bution, and the economic importance of plants are briefly considered. 
Three lectures and one double laboratory period a week. 

Bly 102 — General Zoology 4 credits 

Prerequisites: High school or college chemistry or physics or Ps 105- 
104 or Bly 101 and approval of area chairman. The fundamental 
principles of the physical invertebrate and vertebrate animals, with 
emphasis on their structure, evolution, and relationship to man. Three 
lectures and one double laboratory period a week. 

Bly 103-104 — Biological Science 6 credits 

Designed to develop (1) an understanding of, and interest in, the 
nature of organisms through a study of important basic biological 
concepts illustrated and supported by a suitable, carefully limited 
selection of examples; (2) appreciation of the contributions of the 
biological sciences to man's understanding of the world in which 
he lives, his material progress, and his appreciation of the order, 
harmony, and beauty of the world. 

Bly 105 — Laboratory in Biological Sciences 1 credit 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Bly 103. Not required. A laboratory de- 
veloping the concepts of metabolism and the maintenance of life. 
An excellent adjunct to Bly 103-104. 

Bly 205 — Genetics 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six hours in the biological sciences and approval of 
area chairman. A study of the Mendelian laws of heredity with 

[51] 



experimental determination of the various genetic ratios by the culture 
and breeding of fruit flies. One lecture and two double laboratory 
periods a week. 

Bly 303 — General Ecology 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six hours in biological sciences and approval of area 
chairman. An introduction to the study of ecological factors and 
organization in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environment. 
Field work is an examination of representative bio tic communities 
of the Saint Leo area. 

Bly 305 — Reading in the Biological Sciences 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Bly 101-102 or Bly 103-104. Readings in selected con- 
tributions of biology to human thought and welfare and their appli- 
cation both in the sciences and to everyday life. Open to second 
year students who wish to acquire a broader background in biology 
before deciding upon their concentrations. 

Bly 307-308 — Biochemistry S credits 

Prerequisite: Bly 101-102 or Bly 103-104 and Cy 101-102 and ap- 
proval of the area chairman. A study of chemical principles applied 
to biochemical phenomena; includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, 
proteins, lipoids, enzymes, and vitamins. Three lectures and one 
double laboratory period a week. 

Bly 309 — Anatomy and Physiology 3 credits 

Same as Ph En 309. 

Prerequisite: Six hours in the biological sciences. The structure and 

function of the human body and its systems. 

Bly 330 — Directed Reading in Biology 2> to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eight hours in the biological sciences, Ms 101-102 and 
approval of area chairman. Required of students concentrating in 
biological or related sciences. May be taken concurrently with Bly 
307-308. (Does not duplicate Bly 305.) Seminar reports and dis- 
cussion of selected readings designed (1) to broaden and to deepen 
the student's grasp of the direction, scope, and significance of current 
research and (2) to foster and to sharpen his spirit of inquiry into the 
field. 

[521 



Bly 401-402 — Histology 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours in the natural sciences above the 100 
level and approval of area chairman. Essentials of histology. A 
course consisting of a systematic study of the cellular structure of the 
fundamental tissues, organs, and organ systems of the mammalian 
body. Two lectures and one double laboratory period a week. 

Bly 430 — Individual Work in Biology 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Bly 330 and approval of area chairman. Designed to 
provide opportunity for guided intensive independent research or 
study of a selected phase or problem relevant to the student's purpose 
and interest. 

Bly 499 — Senior Seminar in the Natural Sciences 6 credits 

Required of all seniors concentrating in any one of the natural sciences. 
(A divisional seminar; same as Cy 499, Ps 499, and Ms 499.) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Typewriting 101 — Elementary Typewriting 

An introductory course for students with no previous instruction in 
typewriting who desire a knowledge of basic keyboard skiUs and 
fundamental applications. Five hours laboratory per week. (Non- 
credit service course.) 

Typewriting 102 — Advanced Typewriting 

Prerequisite: Typewriting 101 or equivalent. Letters, business papers, 
reports, and speed development. Five hours laboratory per week. 
(Non-credit service course.) 

Bsn 101 — Introduction to Business 3 credits 

Designed to acquaint the student with the major features, the nature, 
the structure, the scope, and the changing aspects of the field of busi- 
ness. Exploratory. 

Bsn 201-202 — Basic Economics 6 credits 

Same as Es 201-202. 



[53 



Bsn 301-302 — Production and Distribution 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Es 201-202 or Sse 201-202 and approval of area chair- 
man. Required of students concentrating in business administration. 
An introduction to the field of business, followed by a study of three 
topics: the production of economic goods; human relationship in- 
volved in this production process; and the methods used to distribute 
the products of industry. 

Bsn 305-306 — Financial Policies of Corporations 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Acg 201-202, Ms 215, Es 201-202, or approval of area 
chairman. Required of students concentrating in business adminis- 
tration. An intensive study of the fundamentals of corporation finance 
and investment, with apphcation through the practice of making 
actual financial analysis of well-known American corporations. 

Bsn 401-402 — Business Law 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours at the 300 level in economics, political 
science, or business administration, or approval of area chairman. 
Required of students concentrating in business administration. Pre- 
sents the fundamentals of the law of contracts, sales, negotiable in- 
struments, partnerships, and corporations. Stresses the person's legal 
rights and duties in the business world. 

Bsn 450 — Field Experience 3 to 6 credits 

For advanced students concentrating in business administration who 
are preparing to enter a field of business. Approval of area chairman 
required. 

Bsn 499 — Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 6 credits 

Required of students concentrating in business administration. (A 
divisional seminar; same as Es 499, Hy 499, Pel 499, Psy 499, and 
Sy 499.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Cy 101 — General College Chemistry 4 credits 

Study of the common elements, their principal compounds, the laws 
and theories of chemistry. Descriptive study of the elements is based on 
the periodic system and the modern concepts of the structure matter. 
An introduction to the study of chemistry but sufficiently broad in 
scope to meet the need of students concentrating in other fields. Three 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 

[541 



Cy 102 — General College Chemistry 4 credits 

Prerequisite: Cy 101. The laboratory work will be in the field of 
qualitative analysis. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. 

Cy 201 — Qualitative Analysis 4 credits 

Prerequisite: Cy 101-102. Fundamental principles and laws con- 
cerning the behavior of solutions of electrolytes and their application 
to the problem of qualitative analysis. Laboratory work entails the 
systematic separation and identification of common cations and 
anions. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Cy 202 — Quantitative Analysis 4 credits 

Prerequisite: Cy 101-102 and preferably Cy 201. Principles of ionic 
equilibrium and stoichiometry which apply to quantitative precipi- 
tation, neutralization, and oxidation-reduction. Laboratory work 
includes gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and electrolytic 
methods of analysis. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. 

Cy 301-302 — Organic Chemistry 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Cy 101-102 and Cy 201-202 or equivalent and the 
approval of area chairman. A study of aliphatic and aromatic com- 
pounds. This course is taken in the sophomore year by students con- 
centrating in biology and in the junior year by students concentrating 
in chemistry. Two lectures and two double laboratory periods a week. 

Cy 305-306 — Physical Chemistry 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Cy 201-202, Ps 201-202, Ms 201-202, and approval of 
area chairman. The physical principles of matter and the laws of 
chemistry; the physical states of matter, the velocity, reactions, of 
thermochemical and electrochemical changes. Two lectures and two 
double laboratory periods a week. 

Cy 307-308 — Biochemistry 6 credits 

Same as Bly 307-308. 

Cy 330 — Directed Reading in Chemistry 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Cy 101-102, Ms 101-102, and approval of area chairman. 
Required of students concentrating in chemistry. May be taken con- 

[551 



currently with either Cy 301-302 or Cy 305-306. Seminar reports 
and discussion of selected readings designed (1) to broaden and to 
deepen the student's grasp of the fundamentals of chemistry and the 
direction, scope, and significance of current research and (2) to 
foster the spirit of inquiry into the field. 

Cy 401 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Cy 305-306. Chemical and physical properties and inter- 
relations of elements and compounds. Atomic and molecular structure 
and bonding, spectroscopy, crystallography, electro-chemistry, and 
thermodynamics applied to investigation of anomalous compounds. 
Problems of nomenclature. 

Cy 403 — Chemical Thermodynamics 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Cy 305-306, Ms 301 . Required of all students concentrat- 
ing in chemistry. Basic energy relations common to all chemical 
phenomena. 

Cy 430 — Individual Work in Chemistry 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Cy 330 and the approval of the area chairman. Designed 
to provide opportunity for guided intensive independent research or 
study of a selected phase or problem relevant to the student's purpose 
and interest. 

Cy 499 — Senior Seminar in the Natural Sciences 6 credits 

Required of all seniors concentrating in any one of the natural sciences. 
(A divisional seminar; same as Bly 499, Ps 499, and Ms 499.) 

ECONOMICS 

Es 201-202 — Basic Economics 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. Introduction to the methods 
and problems of economics combined with a survey of the field. 
The principles of analysis are applied to some of the more important 
problems of modern economic life. 

Es 319 — Economic History of the United States 3 credits 

Same as Hy 319. 

Prerequisites: Hy 201-202 and Es 201-202 or Sse 201-202. Analyzes 

such problems of American economic history as land policy, working 

[56] 



conditions and organization of labor, expansion of national income, 
development of transportation, production and distribution, and 
changing concepts of public policy. Surveys fields of money, bank- 
ing, the tariff, public expenditures, the national debt, and taxation. 

Es 330 — Directed Reading in Economics 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102, or equivalent, Es 201-202, and approval of 
area chairman. Required of students concentrating in economics. 
Directed reading, study, and discussion of selected books, research, 
and reports necessary for an informed background in economics. - 

Es 401 — Money and Banking 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Es 330. Money systems and standards; factors determin- 
ing money supply v^ith emphasis on the role of commercial and 
central banks and fiscal policy; relationships between money, prices, 
production, and employment. Emphasis on general theory and its 
application on a national and international scale. 

Es 403 — Public Finance and Taxation 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Es 330. Critical study of budgeting, expenditures, bor- 
rowing, and taxation of the national, state, and local governments of 
the United States. Critical examination of the use of national estimates 
in the formulation of fiscal policy and economic planning. 

Es 413 — History of Economic Thought 3 credits 

Same as Hy 413. 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and Es 201-202 or Sse 201- 
202 and approval of area chairman. Traces the dominant economic 
spirit of the Western world from Aristotle to the present through a 
study of the leading schools of economic thought and the philosophi- 
cal assumptions of various economists. Pre-capitalism and capitalism 
are compared and contrasted. Marxism and contemporary Com- 
munist economic theory are analyzed and compared. 

Es 430 — Individual Work in Economics 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent, six additional hours of eco- 
nomics, and approval of the area chairman. Designed to provide 
opportunity for guided independent research or study of a selected 
phase or problem relevant to the student's purpose and interest. 

[57] 



Es 499 — Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 6 credits 

(A divisional seminar; same as Bsn 499, Hy 499, Pel 499, Psy 499, and 
Sy 499.) 

EDUCATION 

En 101 — Introduction to Education 3 credits 

The teaching profession is studied in its opportunities and require- 
ments. The development of education in the United States is re- 
viev^ed, and the different levels of instructional and administrative 
organization are outlined. Scientific, philosophical, and theological 
approaches to the fundamental problems of education are indicated. 
Emphasis is placed upon the meaning of education and of the educated 
man. 

En 102 — Social Foundations of Education 5 credits 

Study of education in relation to society with analysis of some of the 
significant problems of the school today. Emphasis on sources for 
continuous study. 

En 205 — Human Growth and Development 3 credits 

Prerequisite: En 102 or Sse 101-102. A study of the grov^th and 
development of the child from infancy to adult status. Emphasis is on 
the psychological effects of the experiences related to family, peer 
groups, school, church, and other community agencies. Explains and 
identifies individual differences and their effects. The significance 
of person is developed. 

En 301-302 — The School Program 6 credits 

K through Grade 12 

Prerequisites: En 102 and En 205 or equivalent and approval of area 
chairman. Required of students concentrating in education with the 
expectation of teaching in either a public or non-public school. First 
trimester develops an over-view of the entire school program with 
specific reference to function and goals, the curriculum, principles 
of teaching, guidance, methods and materials of instruction, evalua- 
tion, organization, and administration. The second trimester is con- 
ducted through directed reading, observation, and the seminar ap- 
proach to provide more effectively the opportunity for individual 

[58] 



students to concentrate on either the elementary or the secondary 
school program and to bring the results of their special study to the 
group for discussion, thus emphasizing the continuity of the entire 
program. 

En 305 — Principles of Guidance 3 credits 

Same as Psy 305. 

Prerequisites: En 102 and En 205 or equivalent and approval of area 
chairman. Designed particularly for teachers in service. Relation 
of guidance to the teaching function. Development of principles; 
application to specific problems. 

En 307 — Method: The Theory and the Practice 3 credits 

Prerequisites: En 102 and En 205 or equivalent and approval of area 
chairman. A critical study of current methods of instruction in the 
elementary and secondary schools and in the junior college. Examines 
the relation of method to the function of the school, the objectives of 
the subjects taught, the nature of learning, the role of the learner, the 
role of the teacher, the unity of knowledge. Evaluates current prac- 
tices (methods and techniques) in terms of a philosophy of education 
which values the individual as a person. Designed primarily for 
teachers in service. 

En 407 — Philosophy of Education 3 credits 

Same as Py 407. 

En 410 — Internship 9 credits 

Prerequisites: En 301-302, eighteen hours in the subject field to be 
taught, six of which must be at the 300 level, and approval of the 
area chairman. Observation, participation, and supervised teaching 
for one full year in a recognized (accredited) public or non-public 
school. 

En 415 — Educational Psychology 3 credits 

Same as Psy 415. 

Primarily for upper division students concentrating in preparation 
for teaching. Understanding of the applications of psychological 
principles to the educational process. Treats such topics as individual 
differences, principles of learning, transfer of training, and the nature 
of reasoning. 

[59] 



En 430 — Individual Work in Education 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours in education and approval of area 
chairman. Designed to provide opportunity for guided independent 
research or study of a selected topic or problem relevant to the 
student's purpose and interest. 

En 499 — Senior Seminar in Philosophy, Theology, and 

Education 6 credits 

Required of students concentrating in education. (A divisional 
seminar; same as Py 499.) 

ENGINEERIiNG 

Eg 101 — Elementary Engineering Drawing 3 credits 

Correct use of drafting tools, freehand lettering and the principles and 
practice of follov^ing: orthographic projection, isometric, oblique, and 
perspective drawing; auxihary and section views. One lecture and 
five laboratory periods a week. 

Eg 102 — Descriptive Geometry 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Eg 101. Training in analysis and graphic solution of 
problems involving three dimensions, and application of these princi- 
ples and methods to practical solution of engineering problems. One 
lecture and five laboratory periods a week. 

Eg 103 — Slide Rule 

Apphcation of the sHde rule to problems in engineering and the 
physical sciences. (Non-credit service course) 

Eg 201 — Advanced Engineering Drawing 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Eg 102. Auxihary views and revolution, pictorial draw- 
ing, working drawings, development of intersections and surfaces, 
charts and graphs. One lecture and five laboratory periods per week. 

Eg 202 — Mechanism and Kinematics 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eg 102, Ms 101, 201. A working knowledge of the na- 
ture of machine motions and of the analysis of the motion of a given 
machine so to proportion and arrange the parts as to give the desired 
motion. One lecture and five laboratory periods per week. 

[60] 



ENGLISH 

Eh 100 — Rhetoric 3 credits 

For students deficient in the technical aspects of writing, grammar, 
punctuation, mechanics, spelling; the elements of rhetoric; methods 
of analysis. Satisfactory completion of the course will enable the 
student to continue with Eh 102. 

Eh 101-102 — Thought and Expression: Basic Freshman 

English 6 credits 

Designed for practical training in effective reading, writing, speaking, 
and listening, with particular emphasis on the development of a 
critical and analytical attitude toward the various modes of com- 
munication. Emphasis on logic. 

Eh 201-202 — English Literature 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Eh 101-102 or equivalent. An intensive survey of English 
literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present with emphasis on 
major writers and literary types. 

Eh 203-204 — World Literature 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Eh 101-102 or equivalent. An intensive reading and 
study of the masterpieces of literature with emphasis on the perma- 
nent value of these books as expression of the intellectual and moral 
experiences common to mankind. Selections from the ancient, medie- 
val. Renaissance, modem (including the contemporary) worlds. 

Eh 205-206 — The Short Story and the Novel 6 credits 

Open to freshmen and sophomores with approval of the area chair- 
man. Emphasis on the enjoyment of the short story and novel, with 
inclusion of tales, legends, myths, fables, parables. Scope to include 
stories form the Orient, Africa, South and Central America, and 
Canada as weU as Europe and the United States. Writing subordinate 
to reading, focused on personal interpretation. Students encouraged 
to acquire personal library in the field. 

Eh 207-208 — Enjoyment of Literature Through Drama 6 credits 

Open to freshmen and sophomores with the approval of the area chair- 
man. Intensive study of a selected Greek tragedy, a play of Shake- 

[61] 



speare, and one contemporary drama; with production of one play- 
each trimester. 

Eh 209 — Speech: Voice and Diction 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and approval of area chairman. 
Effective voice production, clear articulation, acceptable pronuncia- 
tion, appropriate diction, and pleasing intonation; rhythm and phras- 
ing. Group and individual needs are met. 

Eh 210 — Speech: Effective Speaking 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 209 or equivalent and approval of area chairman. 
Designed to aid the student through demonstration, practice, and 
critical analysis to speak effectively to small and large groups both 
extemporaneously and after studious preparation. Abundant practice 
both on campus and in off-campus conferences. 

Eh 211-212 — Creative Writing 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of area chairman. Designed for students de- 
siring additional training in v^riting and for those interested in ex- 
ploring their talents both in the journalistic and the imaginative. 

Eh 213-214 — Great Books: Non-Fiction 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of area chairman. Open to freshmen and 

sophomores. An intensive study of great non-fiction classics; the 

great ideas; the age they reflect; their authors; their continuing 
significance. 

Eh 301-302 — American Literature 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in 
American history, the humanities, or English literature. Critical 
study of the most important American writers of fiction. 

Eh 303-304 — The English Novel 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 and six additional hours in the humanities 
or English literature. The development of the novel from earlier 
forms; critical study of great English novels selected from each period 
of distinction. 

[62] 



Eh 305 — Contemporary Literature: Drama 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
humanities or in English. Recent and contemporary drama, with 
emphasis upon major English and American playwrights. Con- 
tinental writers will be treated briefly. 

Eh 306 — Contemporary Literature 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Same as for Eh 305. The most important writers of 
twentieth-century prose fiction, with emphasis upon recent novelists. 

Eh 307 — World Drama 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
humanities or in English literature. Some of the most important plays 
in the repertorium of dramatic literature from Aeschylus to Tur- 
genev will be read, analyzed, and discussed. Plays from the Orient, as 
for example the Sakuntala, will be included for exploratory purposes. 

Eh 311-312 — Imaginative Writing 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of English in the 200 level and approval 
of the area chairman. Designed particularly to help the student who 
desires guidance in developing his capacity for original work. 

Eh 330 — Directed Reading in English 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in 
American history, the humanities, or in English literature. Required 
of all students concentrating in English. Purpose is to strengthen the 
student's literary background by assisting him through directed 
independent study and group discussion to acquire a broad reper- 
tory of literature both for his own personal enjoyment and for the 
sharpening of his literary perceptiveness. 

Eh 401-402 — English and American Poetry 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours 
in American history, the humanities, or English literature. Emphasis 
on principal American and English poets of the nineteenth century 
to present. 

[63] 



Eh 403 — Shakespeare 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
humanities or in English literature. Devoted chiefly to the romantic 
comedies and history plays. 

Eh 404 — Shakespeare 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
humanities or in English literature. The great tragedies, notably 
Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. 
Eh 404 may be taken without Eh 403 as a prerequisite. 

Eh 405-406 — Great Books of the Western World 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 301-302 and six additional hours in the humanities 
or equivalent. Intensive study of selected great classics v^hich have 
germinated our culture and contributed significantly to modern 
thought. 

Eh 41 1-412 — Imaginative Writing 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 311-312 and approval of the area chairman. Con- 
tinued development of creative writing by students of unusual 
capacity and power. Writing for publication encouraged. 

Eh 430 — Individual Work in English 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102, six additional hours in English or the hu- 
manities, and approval of the area chairman. Designed to enable the 
student to pursue through independent study a specific topic, subject, 
or period related to his particular interest. 

Eh 499 — Senior Seminar in Literature and Languages 6 credits 

Required of students concentrating in English. (A divisional seminar; 
same as Fie 499.) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 



Fie (Fh-FRENCH, Gu-German, Sh-SpANiSH, Ce-CniNESE) 

101-102; 201-202. 6 to 12 credits 

[64] 



Fie 301-302 — Composition and Conversation in a Selected 6 credits 
Foreign Language (French, Spanish, German). 

Prerequisites: Fie 201-202 in the selected language (French, Spanish, 
German) or equivalent and the approval of the area chairman. Re- 
quired of students concentrating in the language chosen. Designed to 
facilitate (1) accurate and idiomatic v^ritten expression and (2) 
mastery of conversation. 

Fie 330 — Directed Reading in a Selected Foreign Language 3 to 6 credits 
(French, Spanish, German). 

Prerequisites: Fie 201-202 or equivalent in the selected language (French 
Spanish, German) and the approval of the area chairman. May be 
taken concurrently with Fie 301-302 by students concentrating in a 
selected language. Designed to provide abundant experience in read- 
in the literature and acquiring background in the civilization and con- 
temporary life of the country (France, Spain or other Spanish-speak- 
ing countries, Germany). Seminar discussions in both English and the 
selected foreign language, with increasing emphasis on discussion in 
the selected language. 

Fie 401-402 — Advanced Literature, Culture, and Language 6 credits 
OF A Selected Country (France, Germany, Spanish- 
Speaking) 

Prerequisites: Fie 301-302 and approval of area chairman. An intensive 
and appreciative study of the heritage of the selected country, with 
emphasis on the literature and contemporary cultural achievements. 
Conducted entirely in the language. 

Fie 430 — Individual Work in a Selected Foreign 3 to 6 credits 

Language (French, Spanish, German). 

Prerequisites: Fie 202, Fie 330, and approval of the area chairman. De- 
signed to provide opportunity for guided intensive independent study 
of a phase of a selected language particularly relevant to the student's 
purpose and interest. 

Fie 499 — Senior Seminar in Literature and Languages 6 credits 

Required of all students concentrating in a foreign language. (A 
divisional seminar; same as Eh 499.) 

[65] 



ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

Latin 101-102 — Latin I 6 credits 

Latin 201-202 — Latin II 6 credits 

Latin 301-302 — Latin III 6 credits 

Latin 401-402 — Latin IV 6 credits 

Greek 101-102 — Greek I 6 credits 

Greek 201-202 — Greek II 6 credits 

Greek 301-302 — Greek III 6 credits 

Greek 401-402 — Greek IV 6 credits 

GENERAL SEMINAR 

Gsr 100-400 General Seminar 8 credits 

Required of all students each trimester throughout the four years. 
One credit per trimester, six of which may apply to the basic program, 
two to electives. 

HISTORY 

Hy 201 — United States to 1865 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. The expansion of Europe 
into the Western Hemisphere, the English Colonies in North Ameri- 
^ ca, the establishment of American independence, with emphasis upon 

a study of the Constitution, the early national period to the end of the 
Civil War. A problems approach is used with major emphasis upon 
contemporary source materials for each historical period. 

Hy 202 — United States History from 1865 to the present 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Hy 201. A continuation of History 201, emphasizing the 
development of the United States into a great national power, with 
more detailed studies of internal, economic, social, poHtical and cul- 
tural movements and problems. 

Hy 203 — World Civilization 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. A study of the chief charac- 
teristics and achievements of the major cultures which evolved around 

[66] 



the Mediterranean Sea from Ancient Egypt and through Greece, 
Rome, the Byzantine and Islamic Cultures. Medieval Europe to the 
sixteenth century. The Far East Civilizations, particularly India, China, 
and Japan are studied with emphasis on movements, forces, and his- 
torical interpretations. 

Hy 204 — World Civilization 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Hy 203. A continuation of History 203 from the six- 
teenth century to the present. The major emphasis is upon modern 
Western European culture, with a continued analysis of the cultures 
of the Far East and their major historical developments. 

Hy 301-302 — The Early Middle Ages 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours of 
social sciences. The principal political, economic, social, religious, and 
intellectual developments in Europe from the Roman Empire to the 
end of the fifteenth century. Significance of the contribution of 
the Benedictines. 

Hy 303 — Early Modern Europe, 1500-1648 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours of 
social science. Intellectual, religious, and political developments, em- 
phasizing the Northern Renaissance, the Protestant and Roman Catholic 
movements for reHgious reform, and the emergence and the develop- 
ing power of the national state. 

Hy 304 — Early Modern Europe, 1648-1789 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours of 
social sciences. Special attention to the achievements and failures of 
royal absolutism, the scientific, social, and pohtical writings of the 
"Enlightenment," and the dynastic and colonial wars of the seven- 
teenth and eighteenth centuries. 

Hy 305 — Recent Modern Europe, 1789-1870 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours of 
social sciences. Contemporary Europe from the French Revolution 
to 1870. Influence of liberalism, nationalism, and industrialism upon 
pohtical, social, economic, religious, and intellectual life. 

[67] 



Hy 306 — Recent Modern Europe, 1870 to the Present 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours of 
social sciences. Impact of conflicting ideologies, economic crises and 
wars upon European political, social, economic, religious, and intellec- 
tual life, and the interdependence of Europe and the rest of the world. 

Hy 307-308 — The United States in the Twentieth Century 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and Hy 201-202. An historical 
analysis of American society in this century. Special emphasis is 
given to the disappearance of the frontier, the loss of national security, 
the rise of internationalism, the threats and promises of national in- 
dustriahsm, the impact of new interest groups, the rise of secularism, 
and changes in national values. 

Hy 311-312 — History of Latin America 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent, and six additional hours of 
social sciences. Development of Latin American civilization, particu- 
larly in Peru, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, with attention 
to impact of native and European influences on the emerging political, 
economic, social, religious, and intellectual life. Contemporary 
problems. 

Hy 313 — Russian History 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent, six additional hours in history, 
and approval of area chairman. A survey of Russian history from 
1650 to the Revolution: the development of serfdom, the increase 
of contact with Western Europe, the reforms of Peter the Great, 
the growth of the Russian Empire, and the beginning of the Russian 
intelligentsia; the more modern developments, such as the cultural 
achievements of the nineteenth century, the great reforms, the move- 
ment toward parliamentary government, and finally, the Revolution. 

Hy 314 — Modern Russia and the U.S.S.R. 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Hy 313 and approval of area chairman. The decline and 
collapse of imperial Russia and the creation of a new society. Em- 
phasis is placed on the revolutionary movement, the structure of 
the Soviet State, and the problem of historical continuity. 

[68] 



Hy 315 — Far Eastern Civilization 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. A study of the civilizations of 
Eastern Asia; the history and problems from early to recent modem 
times. 

Hy 316 — Far Eastern Civilization 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. A continuation of Hy 315 
into the recent and contemporary period with emphasis on the 
reception and impact of Western ideas and practices on the complex 
problems of American foreign pohcy in that area. 

Hy 317-318 — American Constitutional Law 3 credits 

Same as Pel 317-318. 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102, or equivalent, and Hy 201-202 or Pel 201- 
202. Particularly important for students preparing to teach American 
history and government as well as for students concentrating in 
pohtical science, economics, and business. A complete study and 
analysis of the Federal Constitution, with study and briefmg of lead- 
ing cases in constitutional law. 

Hy 319 — Economic History of the United States 3 credits 

Same as Es 319. 

Hy 330 — Directed Reading in History 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
social sciences. Required of students concentrating in history. Books, 
treatises, and historical documents significant for their relevance to 
major historical events and forces and their continuing impact on 
modern social, economic, political, religious, and intellectual theory 
are studied analytically and critically. Designed to strengthen the 
student's historical background by assisting him through directed 
independent study and group discussion to know, and not merely to 
know about, some of the major sources of historical thought. 

[69] 



Hy 409 — Political Parties 3 credits 

Same as Pel 409. 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102, or equivalent, and six additional hours in the 
social sciences. The composition, organization, and structure of 
American political parties; and their role and relationship in the 
political process. 

Hy 411 — Intellectual History of Europe 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in 
philosophy or theology or the humanities or the social sciences. The 
historical significance of the main currents of Western thought from 
the Renaissance to the present, v^ith consideration of their impact on 
changing and on abiding values. 

Hy 413 — History of Economic Thought 3 credits 

Same as Es 413. 

Hy 430 — Individual Work in History 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in 
history, and approval of area chairman. Designed to enable the stu- 
dent to pursue under guidance study of a specific historical topic, sub- 
ject, or period not provided for in the regularly scheduled courses 
and relevant to his interest and purpose. 

Hy 499 — Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 6 credits 

Required of all students concentrating in history. (A divisional 
seminar; same as Bsn 499, Es 499, Pel 499, Psy 499, and Sy 499.) 

HUMANITIES 

Hs 201-202 — Humanities 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Eh 101-102 or equivalent. A study of philosophy, litera- 
ture, religion, history, drama, and the fine arts of painting, sculpture, 
and music. Hence, this basic course in the humanities aims to develop 
understanding of the diverse ideas and forms in comtemporary 
Western culture. To achieve this purpose representative materials in 
philosophy, hterature, art, music, and sculpture wiU be used through- 
out the course. 

[70] 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Library Science 301 — Book Selection 2 credits 

General principles of evaluation and selection of books and materials; 
sources for the enrichment of the curriculum and book collection in 
public and in school libraries; methods of purchase. 

Library Science 303 — Classification and Cataloging 2 credits 

Organization of library collections; the principles and fundamentals of 
classification; study of the Dewey decimal and the Library of Con- 
gress methods of classification and the principles of cataloging. 
Includes laboratory work. 

^ Library Science 305 — Reference and Bibliography 2 credits 

Selection, evaluation, and interpretation of the most frequently used 
reference materials in the subject field, reference methods, bibUo- 
graphic form and reference. 

Library Science 307 — Library Organization and Administration 3 credits 

Techniques needed for planning and organizing the hbrary and mak- 
ing it function in the school and community. 

Library Science 309 — Book Selection for High School 2 credits 

Librarians 

Sources and principles underlying the selection of books and ma- 
terials appropriate to various age levels. 

Library Science 401 — Audio- Visual Materials 3 credits 

Selection and use of audio- visual aids; community resources; training 
for effective organization and distribution of learning materials ap- 
propriate to various age levels. 

Library Science 410 — Internship 3 to 6 credits 

Practical experience in a library under the direction of a certified 
librarian. 

[71] 



MATHEMATICS 

Ms 101 — College Algebra and Trigonometry 5 credits 

Prerequisites: Two units of high school algebra or equivalent and 
approval of area chairman. A study of systems of real numbers, 
functions, exponentials, trigonometric functions, analytical trigo- 
nometry, complex numbers, theory of equations, systems of equa- 
tions, permutations, combinations, and probability. Credit will not 
be given for this course if credit has been obtained for Ms 111. 

Ms 102 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 5 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 101 or Ms 112 with a grade of C or better in Ms 112. 
A study of real numbers, functions, derivatives, limits, continuity, 
theorem of the mean, applications of the derivatives and conies, and 
introduction to integrals. 

Ms 109 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Desire to learn, intelligence, curiosity, determination. 
Stresses the nature of mathematics as one dimension of man's search 
for truth and its logical development from a few fundamental princi- 
ples. Application of mathematical ideas to selected aspects of contem- 
porary civilization, such as computers, linear programming, theory 
of games. Techniques, while not neglected are subordinate to, and 
derived from, concepts. 

Ms 111 — Introductory College Mathematics I 3 credits 

A study of the basic concepts and fundamentals of mathematics. 
Emphasizes fundamental ideas and concepts of arithmetic and algebra. 
The topics in their order of treatment are: logical processes, language 
of mathematics, laws of addition and multiplication, natural numbers, 
rational, irrational and complex numbers, basic algebraic operations, 
uses of units, exponentials, other number systems, functional notation, 
algebraic functions, ratio, proportion, percentage, quadratic functions, 
polynomials, other functions, theory of equations, roots, synthetic 
division, sketching of functions. Five hours a week. 

Ms 112 — Introductory College Mathematics II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 111 with a grade of C or better. A continuation 
of the study of basic concepts and fundamentals of mathematics pre- 
viously begun in Ms 111. The topics in their order of treatment are: 

[72] 



sequences, permutations, probability, binomial theorem, matrices, 
mathematical induction, angular measure, trigonometric functions, 
identities, inverse trig functions, polar coordinates, sketching polar 
loci, complex numbers, and vectors. 

Ms 201 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 102. A study of the integral, fundamental theorem 
of calculus, area, volume, work, exponential, logarithmic, inverse 
trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, 
polar coordinates, vectors, and three dimensional anlaytic geometry. 

Ms 202 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 201 . A study of linear systems and matrices, partial 
derivatives, multiple integration, L'Hospital's Rule, improper inte- 
grals, sequences, and infinite series. 

Ms 215 — Elementary Statistics 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 109, Ms 111, or Ms 101. Designed as a service course 
for students concentrating in fields other than mathematics. 

Ms 301 — Differential Equations 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 201-202. Meaning of differential equations, types 
and application of different equations of the first order, integral curves, 
trajectories, approximate solutions, linear differential equations with 
constant coefficients, applications of linear differential equations, the 
derivative operator, LaPlace Transforms, and series solutions. 

Ms 303 — Probability and Statistics 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 201-202. Theorems in probability, central limit 
theorem, law of large numbers, binomial measures, Poisson approxi- 
mation, Markov chains, applications. 

Ms 305 — Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 202. Numbers and number systems; the Algebra of 
sets, groups, r/ngs, fields, matrices; isomorphism and homomorphism; 
vector-space; theory of equations. 

Ms 330 — Directed Reading in Mathematics 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in mathematics and approval of area 
chairman. Required of students concentrating in mathematics. May 
to be taken concurrently with Ms 301. Designed (1) to broaden and 

[73] 



to sharpen the student's grasp of mathematics as a natural science 
(philosophical), of its historical development, and the direction, 
scope, and significance of current theory and application of mathe- 
matics and (2) to sharpen his spirit of inquiry into the field. 

Ms 401 — Advanced Calculus I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 301. The real number system, continuous func- 
tions, functions of several variables, theorems of partial differentia- 
tion, mappings, transformations, vector fields, line and surface in- 
tegrals. 

Ms 402 — Advanced Calculus II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 401. Point Set Theory, theory of integration, Rie- 
mann integrals, infinite series, power series, gamma and beta func- 
tions, analytic functions, Fourier series and integrals. 

Ms 430 — Individual Work in Mathematics 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Ms 301 and approval of area chairman. Designed 
to provide opportunity for guided intensive independent research 
or study of a selected phase or problem relevant to the student's pur- 
pose and interest. 

Ms 499 — Senior Seminar in the Natural Sciences 6 credits 

Required of students concentrating in mathematics. (A divisional 
seminar; same as Bly 499, Cy 499, Ps 499.) 



MUSIC 

Mc 101 — Popular Music in the United States; An 3 credits 

Introduction to Music Appreciation 

Required of all students except those who through previous training 
and experience have acquired the understanding and appreciation of 
music desirable for a more advanced course. Study of: history of 
American jazz; folk music in the New World; and music in the 
American theatre. 

[74] 



Mc 110, 210, 310, 410 — The Abbey Singers 

Membership is open to all students who hke to sing. This group 
appears on campus and visits schools, churches, and civic and social 
organizations v^ith concert programs. (Non-credit course.) 

Mc 201 — Music and Emotion 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Mc 101 or equivalent. Study of relation of music and 
emotion v^ith emphasis on the student's ov^n emotional states while 
listening to music of various types; analysis of use of background 
music in various institutions of American society; exploration of 
career opportunities in music therapy. 

Mc 203 — Music of the Americas 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Mc 101 or equivalent. Exploratory study of the music 
of South Americans and the musicological lore connected with it. Ap- 
preciation of the music of the various mixed ethnic groups, produced 
by their combining aboriginal and Spanish musical idioms. 

Mc 205 — Applied Music; Music Creation 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Mc 101 or equivalent. Active participation in musical 
creation. Value to be sought and to be cherished is the benefit to 
the individual through the creation of music, whether it be instru- 
mental or vocal or both. 

Mc 301-302 — The Esthetics of Music 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Mel 01 or equivalent and the approval of area chair- 
man. (Admission into this course presupposes a knowledge of 
musical notation.) The course is directed toward developing insight 
into, and appreciation of, the music styles and tastes prevailing in the 
following historical periods of Western civilization: (1) Medieval; 
(2) Renaissance; (3) Baroque; (4) Rococo; (5) Classical; (6) Roman- 
tic; (7) Modern. 

Mc 120, 220, 320, 420 — Applied Music 2 to 16 credits 

Private instruction in piano, organ, voice, vioHn, cello, and other 
orchestral and band instruments. Approval of area chariman. 
Credit will be as follows: (1) one credit a trimester for a half-hour 
lesson and six hours of practice a week; (2) two credits a trimester for 
two half-hour lessons and twelve hours of practice a week. 

[751 



PHILOSOPHY 

Py 103 — Logic: the Art of Thinking 3 credits 

The principal objective of this course is (1) to help the student think 
with more accuracy, clarity, and completeness, and (2) to help him 
apply this knowledge in analyzing the thinking of others as expressed 
in speech and print. The course treats formal and material logic. It 
covers demonstrative, dialectical, rhetorical, and poetic argument. 

Py 201 — Philosophy of Nature 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Eh 101-102 or Py 103. Required of first trimester sopho- 
mores and transfer students. A philosophical consideration of the 
realm of nature with a view to the data and problems presented to 
philosophy by the physical and the social empirical sciences and 
mathematics. 

Py 207 — Philosophy of Man 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 or Py 103 and Py 201. Required of second 
trimester sophomores and transfer students. Treats psychology from 
the philosophical standpoint which takes account of experimental 
data but is not necessarily restricted to it. Considers the nature of life 
in general and vegetative, animal, and intellectual life in particular. 
Includes within its scope human cognition, appetition, the spirituality 
and immortality of the human soul, and the freedom of the human 
will. 

Py 301 — Ethics 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Py 201 and Py 207 or equivalent. Required of all juniors. 
This course considers the ultimate end of man and the morality of 
human actions in general and as applied to the rights and duties of 
the individual in family, social, and political life. 

Py 303 — Metaphysics 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Py 201 and Py 207 or equivalent. Required of all seniors 
as part of the core program and of aU juniors concentrating in philo- 
sophy. This course presents the basic elements of a Christian wisdom 
in terms of St. Thomas' appreciation of God, being, and man. It 
attempts to provide the student with an insight into the spirit and 
basic content of a truly Christian philosophy. 

[761 



Py 305-306 — History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Eh 101-102 and six additional hours approved by area 
chairman. First trimester — Ancient philosophy proceeds from the 
origins of philosophical thought among the Greeks to Plotinus. 
Second trimester — Medieval philosophy considers the major in- 
fluences in Christian, Arabian, and Jewish philosophy from the time 
of St. Augustine to that of Nicholas of Cusa. 

Py 330 — Directed Reading in Philosophy 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Py 201 and Py 207 or equivalent. Required of students 
concentrating in philosophy. Group discussions of selected readings 
from ancient, medieval, and modern authors confront the student 
with the best thought and fundamental problems of philosophy and 
assist him to develop the philosophical habitus. 

Py 401 — Epistemology 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Py 330 and the approval of area chairman. The course 
concentrates the attention of the student on the problem of the certi- 
tude of our cognitions. 

Py 403 — Natural Theology 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Py 303, Py 330, and approval of area chairman. Pri- 
marily a study of St. Thomas' Philosophy of God, as found in the 
Summa Contra Gentiles and Summa Theologiae. 

Py 405-406 — History of Modern and Contemporary 6 credits 

Philosophy 

Prerequisite: Approval of area chairman. First trimester — Modern 
philosophy considers the main currents and outstanding figures of 
European philosophy from Descartes to the disciples of Kant. Second 
trimester — Contemporary philosophy considers trends and figures 
of Western philosophy from Hegel to our own day. 

Py 407 — Philosophy of Education 3 credits 

Same as En 407. 

Prerequisite: Py 330 or twelve hours in education. Considers the 

basic principles, the nature, and the ends of education and emphasizes 

[77] 



the role of the intellectual and moral virtues in the teaching and 
learning situation as well as the function of education in society. 

Py 430 — Individual Work in Philosophy 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Py 201 , Py 207, Py 330, and approval of area chairman. 
Designed to enable the student to pursue under guidance study of a 
specific problem or aspect of philosophy not provided for in the 
regularly scheduled courses. The problem or aspect selected to be 
studied must be related to the student's particular field of interest and 
purpose. 

Py 499 — Senior Seminar in Philosophy, Theology, and 6 credits 

Education 

Required of all students concentrating in philosophy. (A divisional 
seminar; same as En 499.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Ph En— 101-102; 201-202 — Physical Education and Health 

Required. Four trimesters of approved v^ork in physical education are 
part of the requirements for a degree. These include: archery, basket- 
ball, tennis, touch football, volleyball, modern dance, soccer, bicy- 
^ cling, badminton, fencing, wrestling, Softball, swimming, and golf. 

Ph En 309 — Applied Anatomy and Physiology 3 credits 

Same as Bly 309. 

Prerequisite: Six hours of biological science. The structure and func- 
tion of the human body and its systems, and their application to the 
fields of physical education and health education. 

Ph En 311 — Principles of Physical Education 3 credits 

Prerequisites: EnlOl-102 and En 205 or equivalent. Principles under- 
lying contemporary theory and practice in physical education. 

[78] 



Ph En 321 — Teaching Physical Education in tfie Secondary 3 credits 
School 

Prerequisites: En 101-102 and En 205 or equivalent and pre- or co- 
requisite Ph En 311. Materials, content, and techniques in the teach- 
ing of physical education in the secondary school. 

Ph En 421 — Administration of Physical Education and 3 credits 

Athletics 

Prerequisites: Ph En 321 and approval of area chairman. Policies, 
standards, and procedures as they pertain to the administration of the 
physical education and athletic programs. 

PHYSICS 

Ps 101-102 — General Physics 8 credits 

A study of the fundamental concepts and bws of physics and their 
applications. Heat, mechanics, sound, light, magnetism, electricity, 
electronics, and nucleonics. Three lectures and one two-hour labora- 
tory period per week. 

Ps 103 — Survey of Physical Science 3 credits 

The development of science in general, including the study of meteor- 
ology, climatology, astronomy, physical geography, and geology. 

Ps 104 — Survey of Physical Science 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ps 103. The fundamental concepts of chemistry and 
physics with the use of simple mathematics in their application to 
everyday life. A study of chemical, physical, and nuclear changes; 
the nature, structure, and classification of chemical elements and 
compounds; the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen cycles; forms of 
energy including combustion, sound, light, and electricity. Especially 
recommended for students who plan to take physics and chemistry but 
who have not had courses in these areas in high school. 

Ps 201 — Physics 4 credits 

Prerequisites: Ms 101, Ms 102, and co-requisite Ms 201. Mechanics, 
sound, and heat. Units and theory of measurement, force, work 
energy, power, statics, dynamics, elasticity, simple harmonic motion, 
statics, and dynamics of fluids. Kinetic theory of gases and thermody- 
namics. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 

[79] 



Ps 202 — Physics 4 credits 

Prerequisite: Ps 201. Light, magnetism, electricity, electronics, and 
nucleonics. Magnetism and electrostatics, electro-motive force and 
A. C. and D. C. currents and circuits. Optics, interference, and 
polarization of light. Radiation phenomena and nuclear physics. Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Ps 301 — Theoretical Mechanics 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ps 202. An intensive study of coplanar and spatial vector 
quantities. The statics and dynamics of particles, rigid bodies, and 
fluids form the basis of this course. Topics include: forces, couples, 
static and dynamic friction, centroids, movements of inertia, hydro- 
statics, rectilinear and curvilinear motion, impulse, momentum, 
work, power, energy, and hydrodynamics. 

Ps 302 — Light and Radiation 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ps 202. A theoretical study of electromagnetic radiation. 
Visible light phenomena are emphasized. Study of lenses, inter- 
ference, diffraction, and polarization. 

Ps 303 — Electricity and Magnetism 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ps 202. A study of the fundamental theory of electricity 
and magnetism, including conductors and dielectrics, magnetic 
forces and energy of current, magnetic materials, transient and alter- 
nating currents. 

Ps 304 — liEAT AND Thermodynamics 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Ps202. This course presents the fundamental principles 
of heat phenomena: laws of thermodynamics; equations of state; 
thermodynamic equilibrium; free energy surface phenomena; and 
radiation. 

Ps 330 — Directed Reading in Physics 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Ps 201-202 and approval of area chairman. Required 
of students concentrating in physics. May be taken concurrently with 
Ps 301-302. Seminar reports and discussion of selected readings de- 
signed (1) to broaden and to sharpen the student's grasp of the histori- 
cal milestones in the development of physics, the impact of changing 
theory on the culture of a given period, and the direction, scope, 

[80] 



and significance of current theory and application and (2) to sharpen 
his spirit of inquiry into the field. 

Ps 401-402 — Fundamental Atomic and Nuclear Physics 6 credits 

'Prerequisite: Ps 202. A study of atomic models, special theory of 
relativity, wave nature of matter, nuclear size, spin, parity, decay, 
nuclear reactions, fission, and fusion. 

Ps 430 — Individual Work in Physics 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Ps 301-302 and approval of area chairman. Designed to 
provide opportunity for guided intensive independent research or 
study of a selected phase or problem relevant to the student's purpose 
and interest. 

Ps 499 — Senior Seminar in the Natural Sciences 6 credits 

(A divisional seminar; same as Bly 499, Cy 499, Ms 499.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Pel 201 — American National Government 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. The origin, nature, and de- 
velopment of the Constitution, the organization, powers, and func- 
tioning of the Presidency, the national administrative agencies. Con- 
gress, and the federal courts. 

Pel 202 — American State and Local Government 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. The principal features of 
state and local government, such as: constitution, taxation programs, 
law enforcement and administration of justice, problems of metro- 
politan areas, interstate relationship, government regulation and 
operation of public utilities, and public planning. 

Pel 205 — Communism and the Modern World 3 credits 

The purpose of this course is to present to the student a study of the 
objectives of World Communism, its program and its techniques, 
the nature of the economy and politics of Russia and China. At the 
same time, by contrast, to emphasize the advantages of our own eco- 
nomic and political systems. 

[81] 



Pel 303 — Comparative Government 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Six hours of political science. The government and 
politics of Great Britain and the Commonv^ealth of Nations. Special 
emphasis on historical, cultural, social, and economic determinants 
of current institutions and policies. Constitutions, parties, legislatures, 
executives, civil service systems, law, and local government. 

Pel 304 — Comparative Government 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Pel 303. The second half of the course Pel 303-304. The 
government and politics of France, Italy, Germany, and the U.S.S.R. 
A comparative analysis of the theory and practice of modern totali- 
tarianism. 

Pel 305 — Public Administration and the Political Process 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Pel 201-202 or equivalent. The role of administrative 
agencies in the formulation and implementation of public policy. 
Emphasis on the politics of administration. Problems in administra- 
tive management. 

Pel 317-318 — American Constitutional Law 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
social sciences. A complete study and analysis of the Federal Consti- 
tution, with study and briefing of leading eases in constitutional law. 
Same as Hy 317-318. 

Pel 330 — Directed Reading in Political Science 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in 
political science. Required of all students concentrating in political 
science. Directed reading and study of selected classics in economies, 
history, political science, sociology, and cultural anthropology. 
Designed to strengthen the student's inteUectual background by as- 
sisting him through directed independent study and group discussion 
to know, and not merely to know about, some of the major sources 
affecting political theory. 

Pel 409 — Political Parties 3 credits 

Same as Hy 409. 

Prerequisite: Pel 201-202 or equivalent. The composition, organiza- 
tion, and structure of American political parties; and their role and 
relationships in the political process. 

[82] 



Pel 411 — The Presidency 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Pel 201-201 or equivalent. The central role of the 
American Presidency in the political process. Emphasis on the con- 
tempory institutional nature of that office and the behavior of its 
occupants. 

Pel 430 — Individual Work in Political Science 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 and six additional hours in political science 
and approval of the area chairman. Designed to provide opportunity 
for guided intensive independent research or study of a selected phase 
or problem relevant to the student's purpose and interest. 

Pel 499 — Senior Seminar in Social Science 6 credits 

(A divisional seminar; same as Bsn 499, Es 499, Hy 499, Psy 499, and 
Sy 499.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psy 201 — General Psychology 3 credits 

Open to all students but required of those concentrating in psychol- 
ogy. Psychology as a behavioral science: scope and methods; survey 
of the field — grov^th and development, motivated and emotional 
behavior, learning and thinking, conflict and adjustment. 

Psy 202 — Personality Development 3 credits 

The mechanisms of personality formation, with special emphasis upon 
the varieties of adjustment. The more inevitable problems of human 
life with their normal and abnormal solutions. The origin and modi- 
fication of behavior. Processes of motivation and adjustment. De- 
velopment of personality traits. Techniques of mental hygiene. 

Psy 205 — Human Growth and Development 3 credits 

Same as En 205. 

Psy 207 — Philosophical Psychology 3 credits 

Same as Py 207. 

Psy 21 5 — Statistics 3 credits 

Same as Ms 215. 

[83] 



Psy 301 — Experimental Psychology 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Psy 201, Required of students concentrating in psychol- 
ogy. The basic principles of scientific experimentation. Psychological 
methods, counter-balancing, introduction of research design, random 
groups and matched groups experiments. 

Psy 302 — Experimental Psychology 3 credits 

Prerequi.tes: Psy 301 and Psy 215 (Ms 215). Experimental studies of 
sensory and perceptual processes, human and animal learning, moti- 
vation and emotion. 

Psy 305 — Counseling Psychology " 3 credits 

Same as En 305. 

Psy 330 — Directed Reading in Psychology 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. Required of all students concentrating in psy- 
chology. Purpose is to strengthen the student's background through 
independent study, reports, and seminar discussion of systems and 
theories of psychology, field work, and introduction to research in 
practical problems. 

Psy 401 — Social Psychology 3 credits 

Interpersonal relations, group dynamics, leadership, selective per- 
ception, attitudes, and opinions. Open to all students in the upper 
division. 

Psy 403 — Abnormal Psychology 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Psy 201, 301, 215. Required of students concentrating 
in psychology. Cause, diagnosis, and prevention of extreme devia- 
tions in behavior. 

Psy 415 — Educational Psychology 3 credits 

Same as En 415. 

Primarily for upper division students concentrating in preparation for 
teaching. Understanding of the applications of psychological prin- 
ciples to the educational process. Treats such topics as individual dif- 
ferences, principles of learning, transfer of training, and the nature 
of reasoning. 

[84] 



Psy 430 — Individual Work in Psychology 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in psychology and approval of area chair- 
man. Designed to enable the student to pursue through independent 
study a specific topic or problem relevant to his particular purpose or 
interest. 

Psy 499 — Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 6 credits 

Required of all seniors concentrating in any one of the social or be- 
havioral sciences. (A divisional seminar; same as Bsn 499, Es 499, Hy 
499, Pel 499, Sy 499.) 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Sse 101-102 — Basic Social Science 6 credits 

Required. Designed (1) to assist the student to discover meanings 
for himself as a person functioning v^ith other persons in small and 
large groups, in the larger society, and in the world today; (2) to 
sharpen his knowledge and discriminating use of concepts basic to the 
social sciences; (3) to view the multiplicity of social problems, issues, 
decisions from different points of view at the same time weighing the 
conclusions or actions in the light of Christian values; and (4) to 
serve as a firm basis upon which to develop scholarship in a chosen 
field of the social sciences. (FuU course; must be taken in consecutive 
trimesters.) 

Sse 201-202 — Great Masterpieces of Social, Economic, 6 credits 

and Political Thought 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. Basic theory of the social 
sciences. Recommended especially for students concentrating in the 
natural sciences and mathematics who will terminate study of the 
social sciences in the 'ower division. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Sy 201 — Sociological Foundations of Modern Life 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102. The social institutions of contemporary 
American life in relation to population groups, ethnic groups, and 
technological change. 



[85] 



Sy 202 — Problems of American Society 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102. Major problems of individuals, families, 
and communities. Social forces tending to disorganize basic groups. 
Remedial programs. 

Sy 215 — Elementary Statistics 3 credits 

Same as Ms 215. 

Sy 301 — The Family 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102. Required of students concentrating in 
sociology. Family structure, functions, and relationships. Social- 
cultural differences in family behavior. Comparison of roles and 
values of various cultures. 

Sy 302 — Marriage and the Family 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 and six hours in both theology and philoso- 
phy. A broad ethical and socio-philosophical study of sex, marriage, 
and family problems and theories as they affect the individual person 
and society in the modern state. 

Sy 303 — The Child in American Society 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sy 301. Cultural factors affecting social adjustment of 
children and youth with emphasis on the normal; foster home care; 
guardianship; adoptions; and institutional programs. 

Sy 305 — The Field of Social Work 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and approval of area chairman. 
The grov^th and development of social work. Application of socio- 
logical and philosophical principles to social work activities. Super- 
vised field observations. 

Sy 307 — Cultural Anthropology 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent. A study of culture, cultural 
forms, and their distribution throughout the world. 

Sy 330 — Directed Reading in Sociology 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in the 
social sciences. Required of students concentrating in sociology. 

[86] 



Directed reading, study, and discussion of selected books and reports 
of research necessary for an informed background in the field. 

Sy 401 — Social Psychology 3 credits 

Same as Psy 401. 

Sy 403 — The Social Encyclicals 3 credits 

Open to juniors and seniors. Required of students concentrating in 
sociology. An intensive study and appraisal of the encyclicals of the 
Church and their applications to contemporary institutions such as: 
the family; politics; economics; education; recreation. 

Sy 410 — Internship in Social Work 6 to 9 credits 

For advanced students concentrating in sociology preparing to enter 
social work. Approval of area chairman required. 

Sy 430 — Individual Work in Sociology 3 to 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Sse 101-102 or equivalent and six additional hours in 
sociology and approval of area chairman. Designed to enable the 
student to pursue under guidance a topic or problem relevant to his 
interest and purpose. 

Sy 499 — Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 6 credits 

Required of all students concentrating in sociology. (A divisional 
seminar; same as Bsn 499, Es 499, Hy 499, Pel 499, Psy 499.) 

THEOLOGY 

Ty 101 — Introduction to Theology as a Science 3 credits 

Required. The Bible; nature of inspiration; literary criticism; Divine 
revelation, magisterium of the Church, monotheism; Creation and 
the Fall; Original Sin. 

Ty 102 — Christ in Prophecy and the Foretype 3 credits 

Elective, but desirable for students v^ho are deeply interested in 
theology or in religious education. An extension of Ty 101: Old 
Testament salvation history; key concepts and themes in the story of 
the Chosen People; Adam, Abraham, Moses, and David. 

[87 [ 



Ty 201 — Christ as the Truth of God 3 credits 

Required. True God and True Man; relations to the Holy Trinity; 
life, suffering, death, and resurrection. 

Ty 202 — Christ as the Way 3 credits 

Nature of happiness; values, passions, virtue, habits; grace as the gift 
of happiness; moral theology. 

Ty 301 — Christ as the Life 3 credits 

Required. Sacraments and sacrifice, with emphasis on marriage and 
the Eucharist; sex and the Mother of Christ. 

Ty 302 — Christ as the Life 3 credits 

Virtues specified; faith, hope, love, prudence, justice religion, tem- 
perance, and fortitude; lives of the Saints; Pauline theology. 

Ty 401 — Christ in the Contemporary World 3 credits 

Required. Christ's continuing Incarnation in the Mystical Body; 
theology of the layman — continuing responsibilities and oppor- 
tunities. 

Ty 402 — Christ in the History of the Church 3 credits 

Early patristic, monastic, and medieval; four last things and the 
Parousia (Second Coming). 



[88] 



ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Rt. Rev. Marion Bowman, O.S.B Chancellor 

Very Rev. Andrew Metzger, O.S.B Vice-Chancellor 

Very Rev. Mark Cosgrove, O.S.B Secretary 

Rev. Gregory Traeger, O.S.B Treasurer 

Rev. Robert Velten, O.S.B Member 

Rev. Paschal Baute, O.S.B Member 

Rev. Stephen Herrmann, O.S.B Member 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Mr. Henry C. Hughes, Chairman . . . Saint Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Robert Andrew Brown Pahn Beach, Florida 

Mr. John S. Burks Dade City, Florida 

Mr. N. S. Burns, Sr Dade City, Florida 

Mr. Francis Corrigan San Antonio, Florida 

Mr. A. M. Heleringer Louisville, Kentucky 

Mr. C. P. McCabe San Antonio, Florida 

Mrs. Helene Morris Sarasota, Florida 

Mr. John J. Neilly, Sr St. Petersburg, Florida 

Mr. V.M. Newton, Jr. Tampa, Florida 

Mr. Earl Smalley Miami, Florida 

Mr. Robert Smalley New York, New York 

Mr. Wayne Thomas Plant City, Florida 

Mr. James T. Vocelle Vero Beach, Florida 

[89] 



ADMINISTRATION 

Rev. Stephen Herrmann, O.S.B. President 

Dr. Clara Olson Dean of Academic Affairs 

Rev. Paschal Baute, O.S.B Dean of Student Affairs 

Mr. Herbert Mercready Public Relations and Development 

Mr. John Dressman Registrar 

Rev. Fidehs Dunlap, O.S.B Librarian; Director of Clubs 

Rev. Dennis Murphy, O.S.B Director of Admissions 

Rev. Martin Guiteras, O.S.B Chaplain 

Rev. Richard Kircher, O.S.B Director of Athletics 

Mr. Don Kreusch Director of Student Service 

Sr. Louise Lievens, O.S.B Acting Dean of Women 

STAFF ; 

Medical 

Duane Deal, M.D College Physician 

Jane McCabe, R.N School Nurse 

Brother Peter Mitchell, O.S.B Infirmarian 

Administrative Offices 

Brother Bernard Aurentz, O.S.B. . . Secretary to the Chancellor; Publicity 

Mercedes Korchak Secretary to the President 

Elizabeth Marsh . . . Secretary to the Dean of Academic Affairs 

Judy O'Leary Academic Affairs Office 

Margaret Edenfield Secretary to the Dean of Student Affairs 

Brother Michael Horkan, O.S.B Library Office 

Alice Burger Library Office 

Cecilia Barthle, Elizabeth Nathe, Janice Richter . . . Admissions Office 

Catherine Lovelace Secretary to the Registrar 

Jane Gude Registrar's Office 

Very Rev. Andrew Metzger, O.S.B Business Manager 

Brother Jerome Reimer, O.S.B Bursar 

Brother James Schaufhausen, O.S.B. . . . Assistant to the Treasurer 
Brother Meinrad Schwartz, O.S.B. . . Manager of the Book Store 

Agnes Rieger Assistant Manager of the Book Store 

Mildred Bridges Receptionist 

Gertrude Greenfelder Cashier 

Mary Royal Howard Secretary to Director of Alumni Affairs 

[90] 



FACULTY 

Mrs. Murifx Ames (1963) 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University 
Mr. Norman Ames (1963) 

B.A., Colorado State College 

M.S., Kansas State University 

Advanced Graduate Study, State University of Iowa 
Mr. Francisco F. Andreu (1963) 

B.S.L., University of Havana 

D.C.L., University of Havana 
Mrs. Betty Jane Barish (1959) 

B.S., Florida State University 
Rev. Paschal Baute, O.S.B. (1963) 

B. S., St. Benedict's College 

A.B., University of Notre Dame 

M.A., Loyola University, Chicago 
Rev. Ralph Cinque, O.S.B. (1959) 

B.S., M.S., Fordham University 
Rev. Mark Cosgrove, O.S.B. (1959) 

B.A., St. Benedict's College 

M. A., University of Detroit 
Rev. Vincent Crawford, O.S.B. (1962) 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary and University 

Graduate Study, Lousiana State University 
Mr. John Dressman (1960) 

B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky 
Rev. Fidelis Dunlap, O.S.B. (1958) 

B.A., St. Vincent College 

M.S.inL.S., The Catholic University of America 
Mr. Joseph D. Geiger (1962) 

A.B., University of Florida 
Mr. Lane Goodson (1962) 

B.S., M.S., University of Florida 
Mr. Harry Gill (1963) 

B.A., St. Brendan's College 

M.A., University of London 
Mr. John F. Groselle (1959) 

B.S., Case Institute of Technology 

Graduate Study, University of Florida 

[91] 



Rev. Martin Guiteras, O.S.B. (1963) 

B.A., St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota 

Graduate Study, University Laval, Quebec 
Brother Philip Helmer, O.S.B. (1959) 

B.A., Rutgers University 

Graduate Study, Villanova University 
Miss Margaret Mary Henrich (1958) 

B. A., Trinity College, Washington, D. C. 

M.S.inL.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 
Rev. Stephen Herrmann, O.S.B. (1958) 

B.A., St. Benedict's College 

M.A., The Catholic University of America 

Ed.D., University of Florida 
Rev. Joseph R. Houbrick, O.S.B. (1963) 

B.A., St. Bernard College 

Graduate Study, University of Miami 
Rev. Richard Kircher, O.S.B. (1963) 

B. A., St. Benedict's College 

S.T.L., University of Ottawa 
Mr. Donald Kreusch (1959) 

University of Dayton 

University of Cincinnati 
Mr. Alfred G. Larson (1963) 

B.A., St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota 

Graduate Study, University of Minnesota 
Mr. Hao Le-Van (1963) 

B.S., Rockhurst College 

LL.B., University of Saigon 

M.S., Saint Louis University 

Advanced Graduate Study, Washington University, St. Louis 
Sister Louise Lievens, O.S.B. (1963) 

B.A., Saint Ambrose College 

M.A., De Paul University 

Advanced Graduate Study, University of Illinois 
Rev. Malachy Maguire, O.S.B. (1963) 

B.A., Seton HaU University 

M.Sc.in Ed., Temple University 
Sister Caroline Maertens, O.S.B., (1959) 

B.A.E., University of Florida 

M.A., University of Notre Dame 

Advanced Graduate Study, Barry College and Notre Dame 

[92] 



Mr. Robert J. Merikangas (1964) 

B.A. Tulane University 

M. A., The Catholic University of America 

Advanced Graduate Study, The Cathohc University of America 
Rev. Boniface Meyer, O.S.B. (1960) * 

A.B., St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota 

J.C.B., University of Strasbourg 

Advanced Graduate Study, University of Iowa 
Rev. Dennis Murphy, O.S.B. (1958) 

B.A., St. Benedict's College 

Graduate Study, Fordham University 
Mrs. Clara M. Olson (1962) 

A.B., Florida State College for Women 

M.A.E., University of Florida 

Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Post-Doctoral Study, Delhi University, India 
Rev. Placid Persson, O.S.B. (1961) 

B.A., St. Bernard College 

Graduate Study, Saint Xavier College and Saint Michael's College 
Brother Giles Rettig, O.S.B. (1963) 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Graduate Study, Carnegie Tech 
Sister Mary Grace Riddles, O.S.B. (1959) 

B.A., Mt. St. Scholastica College 

M.Ed., St. Louis University 

Advanced Graduate Study, Florida State University 
Rev. Paul G. Romfh, O.S.B. (1960) 

B.A., Belmont Abbey College 

Graduate Study, The Catholic University of America 
Rev. Leo Schlosser, O.S.B. (1961) 

St. Benedict's College 
Mr. Paul I. Seman (1964) 

B.A., Borromeo Seminary 

M.A., The Catholic University of America 

Advanced Graduate Study, The Catholic University of America 
Mr. George T. Sullivan (1963) 

B.S., University of Tampa 

Graduate Study, Rutgers University 

* On leave of absence 

[93] 



Mr. Robert H. Sullivan (1962) 

B.A., St. Bernard College 

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 
Rev. Augustine Sun (1963) 

S.T.D., University of Propagation of Faith, Rome 
Rev. Peter Sweisgood, O.S.B. (1959) * 

B.A., St. Benedict's College 

M.A., University of Notre Dame 

Advanced Graduate Study, St. John's University, New York 
Rev. Robert F. Velten, O.S.B. (1959) 

A.B., St. Benedict's CoUege 

M.S., University of Notre Dame 
Rev. John B. Wang (1960) * 

Ph.B., St. Valerian, Zaragoza, Spain 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

J.C.D., Pontifical University of St. John Lateran 
Mr. Herbert F. Wolf (1964) 

Ph.D., German University of Prague 
Mr. Miguel Zepeda (1962) 

B.A., Syracuse University 

M.A., Syracuse University 

* On leave of Absence 

ASSOCIATE FACULTY 

Instructors in the Evening Division 

Mr. Oliver Anderson 

B.S., University of Florida 

M.S., Rutgers University 
Mr. Charles Arnade 

A.B., University of Michigan 

M.A., University of Michigan 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
Mr. O. S. Bandy 

A.B., Western Kentucky State University 

M.A., Rollins College 

Ed.D., University of Florida 
Mr. X. L. Garrison r 

A.B., University of Kentucky 

M.Ed., University of Miami 

[94] 



Mr. Jack Hanley 

D.V.M., Ohio State University 
Mr. Roger Kohlstedt 

B.S., (Business Administration) Florida Southern College 

B.S., (Industrial Arts) Florida Southern College 
Mr. John Wendell 

B. A., University of Florida 

LL.B., Stetson University 

Visiting Lecturers in Lecture-Seminars (1963-1964) 

Rev. Dr. Daniel Kucera, O.S.B. 

President, Saint Procopius College, Lisle, Illinois 
Dr. Thomas P. Neill, 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri 
Dr. Joseph J. Schwab 

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 
Rev. Dr. Quentin Schaut, O.S.B. 

Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 
Dr. Barry Ulanov 

Barnard College, Columbia University, New York City 
Dr. John S. Ross 

Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida 

Artists in Residence ■ 

Brother Paul Tennis, O.S.B. 
Mr. Eric Lundgren 



[95] 



INDEX 



Abbreviations 47 

Academic Probation . . 34 

Academic Program . . . . 15 

Academic Regulations . . 31 

Academic Status ... 33 

Academic Suspension . . 34 

Accounting .... 49 

Accreditation .... 12 
Activities . . . . 11,26 

Administration .... 89 

Admission Procedures . . 31 

Adult Education . . . 13 

Advanced Placement ... 32 

Aims of the College . . 9 

American Studies ... 46 

Ancient Language .... 66 

Art 17,49 

Astronomy .... 50 

Athletics 28 

Automobiles 29 

Awards 37 

Basic Program of Studies . . 16 

Biology 51 

Buildings 12 

Business 44 

Business Administration . 53 

Calendar 2 

Campus 12 

Campus Organizations . . 27 

Change of Regulations . . 37 

Chemistry 54 

Classification of Students . . 34 

Clothing 29 

Clubs 27 

ComprehensiveExaminations 24, 36 

Communications ... 6 
Concentrations . . . . 20,43 

Core Program .... 16 

CounseUng, Students ... 10 

Courses, Description of . 49 



Deciding Courses 46 

Degree Requirements . . 35 

Directory 6 

Directed Reading ... 21 

Divisional Senior Seminar . 23 

Early Admission 31 

Economics 56 

Education 58 

Engineering 60 

English 16,61 

Entrance Requirements . . 31 
Evening Program .... 13 

Expenses 38 

Extended Time . . . . 22, 33 

Faculty 91 

Fees 38 

Fields of Concentration . . 18 
Financial Aid .... 40 
Financial Regulations ... 38 
Financial Responsibilities . 39 

Flexibility 21 

Foreign Language . . 17,48,64 
Foreign Language Require- 
ments 17,48 

General Information . . 5 
General Seminars . . . 18,66 

Government, Student . . 27 

Grading System 33 

Graduation Requirements . 35 

Graduation with Honors . . 36 

Guidance Program . . . 10 



History 
Honors 

Honors Program 
Humanities Program 

Independent Study 
Individual Work 



7,66 
36 
45 
45 

22 
22 



Law 44 

Lecture-Seminars 23 

Liberal Arts 45 

Library Science . . . . 45,71 

Literature 17 

Location of the College . . 5 

Loans 41 

Mass 26 

Mathematics 17,72 

Medicine 44 

Music 17,74 



Numbering of Courses 



47 



Officers of Administration . . 89 

Offices of Administration . . 6 

Personal Property .... 39 
Philosophy . . . . 16,76 

Physical Education .... 78 

Physical Fitness 28 

Physics 79 

Political Science 81 

Programs of Study ... 43 

Psychology 83 



Quality Point System ... 34 

Refunds 39 

Regulation, Change of . . 37 
Rehgious Life 26 

Science 17 

Seminars 22 

Senior Seminar .... 23 

Services 13 

Scholarships 40 

Social Life 26 

Social Service 44 

Sociology 85 

Special Students .... 32 

Student Government . . 27 
Student Service . . . 11,27 

Subject Fields 46 

Teacher Education ... 46 
Telephone Numbers . . . 6 

Theology 16.87 

Transcripts . . . . 38, 39 
Transfer Students .... 32 
Tuition 38 

Veterans 41 



PLANNING AN ESTATE 

The Development Committee of Saint Leo College, noting an increase 
in giving to the College, suggests the follow^ing form as a guide to making 
a will containing a bequest favorable to the College. 

"I give, devise and bequeath to Saint Leo College of the Order of Saint 
Benedict of Florida, a Florida non-profit corporation, the sum of$ 

(OR) "All my right, title and interest in the following described 
property: 

(OR) "All the rest, residue and remainder of my estate 

" to be used in such manner as the Board of Trustees of said College 

shall, in its direction, determine. 

(OR) " to be used for scholarships or educational needs."